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Scum

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Scum album cover
01
Multinational Corporations
1:06  
02
Instinct of Survival
2:26  
03
The Kill
0:23  
04
Scum
2:38  
05
Caught... in a Dream
1:47  
06
Polluted Minds
0:58  
07
Sacrificed
1:06  
08
Siege of Power
3:59  
09
Control
1:23  
10
Born on Your Knees
1:48  
11
Human Garbage
1:32  
12
You Suffer
0:05  
13
Life?
0:43  
14
Prison Without Walls
0:38  
15
Point of no Return
0:35  
16
Negative Approach
0:33  
17
Success?
1:09  
18
Deceiver
0:29  
19
C.S.
1:14  
20
Parasites
0:23  
21
Pseudo Youth
0:42  
22
Divine Death
1:21  
23
As the Machine Rolls On
0:42  
24
Common Enemy
0:16  
25
Moral Crusade
1:33  
26
Stigmatized
1:03  
27
M.A.D.
1:34  
28
Dragnet
1:01  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 28   Total Length: 33:07

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Wondering Sound

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Jon Wiederhorn

Contributor

Jon Wiederhorn is a senior editor at Revolver, a regular freelancer for Guitar World and SPIN and the co-author of the upcoming book "Louder Than Hell: The Unce...more »

04.22.11
Speed, aggression and highway construction vehicles: welcome to grindcore.
2000 | Label: Earache

Blending the speed and polemics of hardcore, the aggression and brutality of death metal and the cacophony of highway construction, Napalm Death crafted an ear-shattering sound that served as the blueprint for grindcore. Each side of their debut LP (remember those?) was recorded with a different lineup and delivered complementary blasts of noise therapy that not only launched one of the most powerful of all metal bands, but also served as a springboard for some… read more »

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The first Grindcore

trevoasisr

Finally, eMusic has bequeathed this gem with one of their little pink check marks. Yes, this is the first grindcore album (arguably). The great thing about this album is that it arrived at extreme metal by way of punk, rather than by way of say, Judas Priest. There’s so much passion and venom. I don’t agree with much of what they say, but they do make an impact due to their extreme passion (kinda like Refused). I know, you’re scared to download this because you’d get more for your money by downloading Meshuggah’s “I”. Well, I say you get what you pay for. I too was nervous about downloading a 5 second song (You Suffer). But now I’m the proud owner of the shortest song ever recorded (Guinness Book). That song has brought more smiles to my face than the longest Opeth song ever has. Anything worth having is worth paying full price. So, if you don’t get it here, get it somewhere.

user avatar

Stage divers favourite...

glemix

1 of the originators of the british scene...Instinct of Survival is classic earache!!!

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1

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They Say All Music Guide

As a rallying call for what seemed like millions of bands to follow, not to mention the launching point for the varying careers of Justin Broadrick, Nick Bullen, Mitch Harris, Lee Dorrian, and Bill Steer, Scum deserves its reputation alone. But it’s also fun to listen to — a strange word to use, but no doubt about it, the album has its own brand of rock & roll kicks taken to an almost ridiculous extreme. Split between the original lineup, with Broadrick and Bullen, and the next one, with Dorrian, Steer, and Shane Embury, Scum is a portrait of a place, time, and state of mind. Opener “Multinational Corporations” is the deep breath taken before the plunge: skittering cymbals, low-key feedback squalls, Bullen’s rasped hatred — and then all hell breaks loose. The riffs by both the Broadrick/Bullen and Steer/Embury teams use hyperconcentrated Black Sabbath-via-Motörhead-and-Metallica approaches as starting points, but the moorings are cut loose when everyone concentrates on nothing but speed itself. The combination of hyperspeed drums, crazed but still just clear enough guitar and bass blurs, and utterly unintelligible vocals takes the “loud hard fast rules” conclusion to a logical extreme that the band’s followers could only try to equal instead of better. Interspersed throughout all this on various songs are more obviously deliberate constructions — parts of the title track, say, or the focused chug-and-stomp start of “Siege of Power.” They act as just enough pacing for the rampages elsewhere, where unrelenting, intense sound becomes its own part of weird ambient music, textures above all else. It’s little surprise the free jazz/noise wing latched onto Scum as much as wound-up-as-hell headbangers did worldwide. That practically no song survives past two minutes — much less one — is all part of brusque do-the-job-and-do-no-more appeal. The most legendary number as a result: “You Suffer (But Why?),” running at a mere two seconds. – Ned Raggett

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