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Farmer's Market Barbecue

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Farmer's Market Barbecue album cover
01
Way Out Basie
4:23  
02
St. Louis Blues
7:17  
03
Beaver Junction
4:47  
04
Lester Leaps In
5:02  
05
Blues For The Barbecue
10:30  
06
I Don t Know Yet
4:14  
07
Ain t That Something
4:20  
08
Jumpin At The Woodside
3:23  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 8   Total Length: 43:56

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They Say All Music Guide

This was an excellent outing by the Count Basie Orchestra during its later years. Actually, half of this album features a medium-sized group from Basie’s big band, but his orchestra usually had the feel of a small group anyway. Soloists at this late stage include Eric Dixon and Kenny Hing on tenors, trombonist Booty Wood, altoist Danny Turner and four different trumpeters. The rhythm section is of course instantly recognizable and the music is very much in the Basie tradition. – Scott Yanow