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Near-Myth With Bill Smith

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Near-Myth With Bill Smith album cover
01
The Unihorn
5:19  
02
Bach an' All
3:53  
03
Siren Song
5:46  
04
Pan's Pipes
4:15  
05
By Jupiter
3:56  
06
Baggin' The Dragon
6:51  
07
Apollo's Axe
3:27  
08
The Sailor And The Mermaid
4:17  
09
Nep-Tune
2:55  
10
Pan Dance
3:43  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 44:22

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eMusic Features

3

The Unknown Dave Brubeck

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Naturally enough, obituary writers focused on the milestones in Dave Brubeck's career: his early, proto-cool octet, umptyzillion '50s college dates with his long-running quartet, the Disney waltz "Some Day My Prince Will Come," Take Five with its oddball rhythm patterns, musical revue The Real Ambassadors with Louis Armstrong and his occasional classical compositions. Sketching a career so extensively documented — his recordings span nearly 70 years — necessitates short-shrifting many worthy recordings. Here are a… more »

They Say All Music Guide

This is the third and final guest appearance by clarinetist Bill Smith in the place of Paul Desmond with the Dave Brubeck Quartet. Like the earlier record dates, this 1961 session focuses exclusively on Smith’s compositions, resulting in a very different sound for the band than its normal mix of the leader’s songs and standards. Smith was a member of Brubeck’s adventurous octet of the late ’40s and, like the pianist, also studied with French composer Darius Milhaud. So the clarinetist is willing to take chances, utilizing a mute on his instrument in “Pan’s Pipes,” and having drummer Joe Morello use his timpani sticks on the piano strings in the swinging “The Unihorn.” Smith proves himself very much in Desmond’s league with his witty solos and equally amusing, pun-filled liner notes. While none of these songs became a regular part of Brubeck’s repertoire, even after Smith replaced tenorist Jerry Bergonzi as a member of the quartet in 1982, this is easily the best of the three albums that he made with Dave Brubeck during the late ’50s and early ’60s. – Ken Dryden

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