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Rejoicing In The Hands

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (507 ratings)
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Rejoicing In The Hands album cover
01
This Is The Way
2:53
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02
A Sight To Behold
2:26
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03
The Body Breaks
2:43
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04
Poughkeepsie
2:17
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05
Dogs They Make Up The Dark
1:20
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06
Will Is My Friend
3:04
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07
This Beard Is For Siobhan
2:36
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08
See Saw
3:22
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09
Tit Smoking In The Temple Of Artesan Mimicry
1:25
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10
Rejoicing In The Hands
1:41
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11
Fall
2:53
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12
Todo Los Dolores
2:30
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13
When The Sun Shone On Vetiver
3:34
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14
There Was Sun
1:31
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15
Insect Eyes
5:08
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16
Autumn's Child
2:40
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 16   Total Length: 42:03

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Wondering Sound

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Amanda Petrusich

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Amanda Petrusich is the author of the forthcoming DO NOT SELL AT ANY PRICE (Scribner), a book about collectors of rare 78 rpm records (if you’ve got a basement...more »

04.22.11
A sacred text from the founding father of freakfolk.
Label: Young God Records / Revolver

No matter how much disdain he voices for the genre, Devendra Banhart is the founding father of contemporary freakfolk, and Rejoicing in the Hands… is its sacred text. Taking cues from late '60s warblers Tiny Tim, Marc Bolan and Donovan, Banhart trills about nonsensical creatures in absurd situations, including his beard and other biological ephemera ("Because my teeth don't bite/ I can take them out dancing") over carefully plucked classical guitar and quick bits of… read more »

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user avatar

Shut up, hippie.

semtex

Shut up, hippie.

user avatar

Quite a song

DwayneK

The lyrics of Devandra Banhart's tell a wonderful story of hope. Dwayne

user avatar

amazing!

omahroadrunner22

this is one of the best albums i've heard in a long long time, and i listen to alot of music. the purity of spirit comes through every song. Devendra Banhart is one of the most exciting things to come along, because his music is real, it's truthful, it's pure. It's everything you want in an album, and it leaves you satisfied and wanting more at the same time.

user avatar

his best

winterhunt

but for me that isn't really saying that much....more like least worst.....oh Boy....I know everyone loves him and the whole Freak Folk, idealism but to me it's a very poor man's T Rex with some inane stream of consciousness lyrics and a few Rufus Wainright vocal affectations.......Can't say he isn't talented and he has obviously hit a chord within a lot of folks but I just can't take it seriously...I really tried too....oh well I guess it's my loss.......give me Isaac Hayes, Robert Johnson, Cat Power, Marvin Gaye, Marc Bolan, Curtis Mayfield, Leonard Cohen...I could go on for months really about artists who truly deliver from the heart in a pure form....this is expert posing though, props for the beard schtick.......God I wish I could actually enjoy it....

user avatar

ILOVE YOU I LOVVE YOU I LOVE YOU

orna1

IIIIIIIIIIIII LOVEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE YOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU DEVENDRA BANHART ich leibe dich amore amorre mi amor ANA BACHIBAK ANI OHEVET OTCHA - in hebruo/ilove you

user avatar

Excellent! If eccentric.

David71

No idea what to expect after a performance by a clearly "addled" Devendra Banhardt on Jools Hollands' "Later". However, this albom is awesome. It is part folk, part pop, part unique! Give the opening track a go if you want to dip in but I would recommend the entire albumn - it really is a whole rather than sum of parts.

user avatar

Simply Amazing

sitheris

This is the album that got me into Devendra. His music is very unique - simple yet deep. The melodies are like nothing I've ever heard before, and the lyrics are quite amazing. Very relaxing as well. Do yourself a favor and download this NOW.

user avatar

beautiful!

kreppart

Standout tracks include Will is my friend, This is the way & A sight to behold.

user avatar

just tell the ones that you know they should know

rosbeth

here on display for all to hear is the potential of one inspired young man with an acoustic six-string and a voice so unique and moving that it truly is difficult to find a predecessor with whom to compare or a contemporary to call an equal. i saw him play in tucson, and his live performance surpassed all recordings. it was also my pleasure to meet him, and he is humble and accomodating and simply an interesting human. just tell the ones that you know they should know and don't tell the world lest we lose the small show.

user avatar

Bizarre and wonderful!

Roadrunner

Strange and wonderful!! what a great surprise!

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When Michael Gira’s Young God label issued Devendra Banhart’s glorious home-recorded debut, Oh Me Oh My, on an unsuspecting world, its gorgeous yet sparse primitivism, complete outsider lyric sensibilities, and infectious melodies grabbed hold of listeners all over the world. It offered them a bona fide fissure between popular and underground American culture. Banhart’s aesthetic is no pose; his iconoclastic songwriting could not be farther away from officially sanctioned “alternative” music. However, given the unanticipated coverage and success of the album (by modest indie standards, folks, not those dictated by the biz), a quandary was presented in how to follow it up. Should his new songs — and there were many — be recorded in exactly the same way to preserve the notion of “authenticity?” Or should he not be penalized by having to adhere to the same economic realities, and be nurtured as the developing artist he is? Wisely, Gira and Banhart saw through the smokescreen what a word like “authentic” implies. Banhart’s songs are the authentic outsider article even if he were to record them in Barry White’s studio, so why punish for the sake of a media construct? Gira and Banhart chose a simple but very effective recording studio in engineer Lynn Bridges’ house on the Georgia/Alabama border as their location, getting down 57 songs(!) and choosing 32 for two different albums from the treasure trove. Rejoicing in the Hands is the first of these albums — another will be issued in the fall of 2004. Simply stated, it is a stunner, form start to finish. Banhart’s Muse may be furiously active, but she is tender all the same. The sonic ambience on this disc is breathtaking. Gira and Banhart brought the master tapes back to Brooklyn for some minimal and tasteful overdubbing — a guitar track here, a cello or trumpet there, a piano ghosting through the mix in another place, some spare drumming, hand percussion or vibes somewhere else. Over it all, though, is Banhart’s reedy tenor and edgy, angular guitar playing with its hypnotic insistence carrying the tunes from deep in the interior of his image and sound world to the fore, where listeners can encounter and engage with them. Elements of blues, ragtime, Appalachian rural styles, country music, European and Celtic folk songs: all weave in and out of one another in a seamless yet crackling whole, each of them serving their role in articulating Banhart’s sublimely prismatic, loopy vision. Singling out tracks or quoting from his words would amount to nothing more than sacrilege. This music is simply rendered, to be sure, but unspeakably profound and mercurial; it’s funny, warm, heartbreaking, and evocative of another place and time. There are glimpses here of Greil Marcus’ “old weird America,” the all-but-visible inner terrain that informed certain spiritual, social, and aesthetic elements in our culture. Banhart’s music is utterly unselfconscious and poetic. Rejoicing in the Hands is a whole — each song an inseparable part of an offering for listeners to be, quite literally, enchanted and even awed by. – Thom Jurek

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