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2012

Rate It! Avg: 3.5 (22 ratings)
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2012 album cover
01
Chemical Factory
3:56
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02
Los Angeles
3:21
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03
Wolves And Wolverines
4:19
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04
Reptilians
2:11
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05
Magnetic Electric
2:16
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06
Your Mama Used To Dance
3:08
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07
Lions And Lambs
1:35
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08
Burial Mound
5:14
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09
Her Fires Chill Me
2:39
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10
Tundra
1:30
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11
The King Of Lost Light (A Reprise)
2:08
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12
The Blood And The Milk
6:55
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 39:12

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Write a Review 4 Member Reviews

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Great album

Tides

Nice album, not my favorite piece by them, but certainly good. By the way, the guy below me saying this guy is ripping-off Captain Beefheart should be ignored. The fact that he even compared it to Beefheart means he doesn't know what he is talking about. I've seen OTR live and I grew up listening to Captain - even saw him perform an anonymous show in the Texas desert. The similarities between the two are present, but they have a completely different style and approach. The music may end up with aspects resembling each other, but overall Beefheart and Old Time Relijun perform completely different kinds of music

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leave the captain alone

eczematique

this is exactly what the captain was talking about in "sue egypt" when he says "all those people that ride on my bones, that nobody hears that nobody knows". take beefheart's music, make all the rhythms into 4, make the song structures predictable, the vocalist constipated, whattadyou got? Z grade wannabe-quirky new wave by people with no originality or talent.

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Brilliant

JBB

These are my favourite of the new breed of post punk-sters. They have managed to assimilate some of the most exciting post punk –Beefheartian musical ideas into an exciting and unique rock form. The genius of Captain Beefhreart’s magic band (for whom they are named) shines through…along with other luminary influences such as Cave’s “Prayers on Fire” era Birthday Party and Jon Spenser. Brilliant.

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eMusic pick?

whitetrashpuppetshow

This is unlistenable. Uninspired wannabe avant garde instrumentation topped with abrasive vocals. Am I missing something here?

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eMusic Features

1

Six Degrees of Captain Beefheart’s Safe As Milk

By Yancey Strickler, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

The consistently jittery, jarring tone of 2012 is both consistent with Old Time Relijun’s past releases, and not something that will be everyone’s cup of tea, so consciously does it strive for an unsettled groove. Still, OTR have undeniably developed a tighter sound over the years, and a funkier one that provokes comparisons to punk-funkers such as James Chance, complete with wailing, agitated saxophone. Arrington DeDionyso’s vocal yelp will likewise sometimes bring to mind David Byrne, albeit with far less pop-friendly, more hysterical delivery and songwriting than Talking Heads ever managed. It’s not easy to follow what DeDionyso’s going on about as his free-form impressions collide with the clattering musical elements sounding at angles with each other, but they do give off a vague sense of apocalypse. There are, however, some defter shadings here than in the past, whether the jungle-like rhythms of “Reptilians,” the buzzing pulse of “Magnetic Electric,” some mild dub-like vocal echo, and the creepy swamp-funk of “Her Fires Chill Me.” Most surprising of all is the closing instrumental “The Blood and the Milk,” whose combination of wobbly, incantational saxophone and funereal organ place it close to avant-garde jazz-gospel (which, in turn, won’t fail to incite comparisons to some of Albert Ayler’s work). The CD includes an MPEG video of “Cold Water,” a song not on the album, filmed live in Italy. – Richie Unterberger

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