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Thailand - Ceremonial And Court Music From Central Thailand

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Thailand - Ceremonial And Court Music From Central Thailand album cover
01
Sathukan (Fine Arts Department Ensemble)
4:44
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02
Hook (Bangkok Metropolitan Ensemble)
2:02
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03
Keakmon-Bangchang (Rum Phomburi Ensemble)
6:42
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04
Sudsahoun (Bangkok Police Ensemble)
2:12
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05
Kangkaew-Kim Koy (Thai Banlang Ensemble)
0:52
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06
Kom-Ngen (Fine Arts Department Ensemble)
3:59
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07
Soi Lumpang (Bangkok Metropolitan Ensemble)
3:26
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08
Klomnaree (Rum Phomburi Ensemble)
3:54
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09
Maharok (Fine Arts Department Ensemble)
7:07
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10
Sudsahoun (Bangkok Metropolitan Ensemble)
3:04
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11
Khameapothisad (Bangkok Police Ensemble)
4:54
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12
Mang-Phu-Thong (Rum Phomburi Ensemble)
3:02
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13
Deaw Kea Jang (Thai Banlang Ensemble)
1:24
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14
Untitled (Wat Wihanthong Ensemble)
7:35
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 54:57

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A heterophonic sonic journey.

carondelet

As classical Thai music is heterophonic, the songs on "Thailand: Ceremonial and Court Music" are nonharmonic, melodic, or linear. The fundamental musical organization is horizontal. The main melody is played simultaneously with progressively slower and faster rhythmic variants swirling around it in what might seem a cacaphony of sound to a Western ear. The emphasis in classical Thai music is on the final beat of a measure or group of pulses and phrase, as opposed to the first as in European-influenced music. There are various ensembles which perform classical music - on this album, the performers sound as though they are piphat, a form that consists of performances using woodwind and percussion instruments, and mahori, which mixes strings with melodic percussion instruments and flute. Traditional Thai music can sound discordant to the unfamiliar ear, but that distinction adds to its appeal for fans of the music of Southeast Asia.

They Say All Music Guide

Thai music is of diverse origins: Indian, Burmese, and others. Their use of gongs, for example, comes from the Khmer. Thai music is a heterophonic music, which means that all instruments play the same melody, each with its own particular ornamentations or embellishments, giving the music a particular character. Two musicians on the same instrument can even produce these embellishment differently from one another. Moreover, the scale in Thai music differs greatly from Western music. Their scale is divided into approximately seven equidistant pitches, thus sounding out of tune to our ears. Thai phat ensembles can use a large number of different instruments, but the main ones are the ranats, xylophones made either of wooden or iron bars. They also use double-reed wind instruments, flute, lute, fiddle, zither, and percussion. On this CD, listeners hear different ensembles with different combinations of instruments and for different occasions. – Bruno Deschênes

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