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Donuts

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (545 ratings)

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Donuts album cover
01
Donuts (Outro)
0:12
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02
Workinonit
2:57
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03
Waves
1:38
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04
Light My Fire
0:35
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05
The New
0:49
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06
Stop
1:39
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07
People
1:23
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08
The Diff'rence
1:52
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09
Mash
1:31
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10
Time: The Donut of the Heart
1:38
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11
Glazed
1:21
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12
Airworks
1:44
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13
Lightworks
1:55
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14
Stepson Of The Clapper
1:01
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15
The Twister (Huh, What)
1:16
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One Eleven
1:11
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17
Two Can Win
1:47
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18
Don't Cry
1:59
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19
Anti-American Graffiti
1:53
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20
Geek Down
1:19
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21
Thunder
0:54
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22
Gobstopper
1:05
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23
One For Ghost
1:18
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24
Dilla Says Go
1:16
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25
Walkinonit
1:15
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26
The Factory
1:23
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U-Love
1:00
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28
Hi
1:16
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29
Bye
1:27
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30
Last Donut Of The Night
1:39
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31
Welcome To The Show
1:11
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 31   Total Length: 43:24

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Wondering Sound

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Hua Hsu

Contributor

Hua Hsu edits the hip-hop section of URB Magazine and writes about music, culture and politics for Slate, the Village Voice, The Wire and various other magazine...more »

04.22.11
Legendary hip-hop producer’s final solo album
Label: Stones Throw

The memorial T-shirts said it all: “J Dilla Changed My Life.” When Detroit producer James “Jay Dee” Yancey died this past February due to complications from lupus, he left behind an incredible, decade-long body of work, thousands of touched colleagues and fans and an otherworldly aesthetic that his disciples are still trying to wrap their heads around. Known for inventing the ticky-tack, negative-space approach to funk that came to define late-'90s neo-soul, the graceful, swooning… read more »

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Just really enjoyable to listen to...

Anglogalaico

Lara55 below pretty much sums up this must have album--this is to any rap collection what the condiments cupboard is to my kitchen

user avatar

Beautiful

Lara55

Wow... What a talant. Dilla's ability to mash up sounds and weave mood through music is a joy to hear. Beautiful new american songbook. Yeah, they tracks are short. It's a testament to his art - he wrote these while in the hospital people. Never gave up.

user avatar

A Must Have

cmadine

This album should be a part of any music lover's collection. Don't wait. Download it now.

user avatar

Life After Death Success

EMUSIC-00B38C62

This is a collection of basic beats that would have been presented by a producer to someone writing rhymes. A song would have then been built around them. It is still an awesome collection of beats. Some of have been filled out by people like the Roots. Listen to Can´t Stop This on Game Theory.

user avatar

yeah....?

bidgey

Edwina...yeah, you missing the point.

user avatar

You're all barking

Edwina

Nope, don't get it. Sounds to me like a bunch of half ideas. Either these are tracks that were meant to be looped and rapped over or they are a sketchpad of ideas to be worked out. Nothing to hold on to for me. Sorry, not genius, just dull. I've listened to it many, many times but I am clearly still missing the point. Thought I should point out that we don't all see this as one of the "top 5 albums of all time". Sorry. Peace etc.

user avatar

Sampletastic

andyrevelle

This sort of thing is what I like in rap music. The creativity and variety in the sampling and beat construction here is just fantastic. Folks, this is as good as it get.

user avatar

insane

nedsmusic

anyone who rates this under 5 is willingly deaf to music. one of the greatest albums i've ever heard. creative. important. genius.

user avatar

Beat Maker Xtraordinaire

HipHopManiac

We'll miss the remixes and longevity your musi gave us J-Diesel. I Never met him but felt like I knew him as a friend. Shout outs to Baatin, Elzhi, Slum Villa/5th Ele!!!

user avatar

timeless

klinkdiggy

a must in everyone's top 5 albums of all time...run don't walk if you don't have this yet.

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eMusic Features

0

Hey Ma: Maureen Yancey Remembers Her Son, J Dilla

By Hua Hsu, Contributor

There's a disarming effervescence to Maureen Yancey as she shares memories of her late son, the Detroit producer and rapper J. Dilla. It has been over three years since Dilla passed away from complications related to lupus, yet she speaks of him as though he were still a constant source of amusement and inspiration. When asked if Dilla ever tried her seemingly infinite patience, she laughs: "Of course he made me very mad. For a… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Donuts was made on a hospital bed and in a home studio, on a stripped-down setup with a stack of vinyl. Released on its maker’s 32nd birthday, three days before he passed away, the album has a resonance deeper than anyone could’ve hoped for or even imagined. Some who were close to Dilla have said that there are hidden messages in the samples, the track titles, and who knows where else. It’s impossible not to speculate about some things, like the track titled “Don’t Cry,” the looped “broken and blue” from a version of “Walk on By,” the presence of Eddie Kendricks singing “My people, hold on,” or the fact that there are 31 tracks, a possible signal that Dilla survived a little longer than he expected. Then again, for every possible message, there are two or three elements that could’ve been designed to throw any analysis off its trail. After all, if there’s one single image that the disc brings to mind, it’s that of Dilla goofing off, having fun with some of his favorite records, and messing with some heads in the process. (And you could probably make the album’s title out to be a metaphor for the circle of life, but sometimes a donut is just a donut.) Armed with sources that are either known to novice sample spotters or only the most seasoned diggers — surprisingly, the former greatly outweighs the latter — Dilla’s also just as likely to leave his samples barely touched as he is to render them unrecognizable. It’s fitting that Motown echoes, a predominant theme, are often felt, from the use of Dionne Warwick’s Holland-Dozier-Holland-written “You’re Gonna Need Me” (on “Stop”), to the shifting waves of percussion plucked from Kendricks’ “People… Hold On” (on “People”), to the Stevie-like piano licks within Kool & the Gang’s “The Fruitman” (“The Diff’rence”). Most of the tracks fall into the 60-90 second range. It’s easy to be overwhelmed, or even put off, by the rapid-fire sequence, but it’s astounding how so many of the sketches leave an immediate impression. By the third or fourth listen, what initially came across as a haphazard stream of slapped-together fragments begins to take the shape of a 44-minute suite filled with wistful joy. Like everything else Dilla has ever done, Donuts is not defining; in fact, elements of its approach bare the apparent influence of Jaylib collaborator Madlib. His mode has always been too slippery and restlessly progressive to be equated with any one track or album, but Donuts just might be the one release that best reflects his personality. – Andy Kellman

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