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Lush Life (Remastered)

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (529 ratings)

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Lush Life (Remastered) album cover
01
Like Someone in Love
5:00  
02
I Love You
5:33  
03
Trane's Slo Blues
6:05  
04
Lush Life
14:00  
05
I Hear a Rhapsody
6:01  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 5   Total Length: 36:39

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Wondering Sound

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Britt Robson

Contributor

Britt Robson has written about jazz for Jazz Times, downbeat, the Washington Post and many other publications over the past 30 years. He currently writes regula...more »

03.20.06
As classic as it gets.
Label: Fantasy / Prestige

John Coltrane established himself as a solo artist with a prolific series of recordings in 1957 and '58, yet the sessions comprising Lush Life still stand out amid this creative torrent for a couple of reasons. Because Red Garland failed to show up at the studio, the first three tracks put Trane in the relatively rare context of a piano-less trio, and bassist Earl May's judicious style provides further elbow room for the lyrical gushes… read more »

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the way it ought to be

roneill37

This is jazz the way it ought to be: haunting, both sad and joyful; Coltrane was the e e commings of the sax!

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Review by BarbaricArcticE

EMUSIC-00D85870

This is one I just can't understand how anyone could give less than a 5*****. An approachable album for everyone. A brilliant definition of what Jazz can be. Sublime is overused, but not in this case.

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Any doubt?

hypertiger

Any doubt about the love in your heart for someone? Listen to "Like Someone in Love" and maybe that question is easy to answer... Great music.

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Not his best? Who cares!

peterphillips85

I've heard some people say that this is not Coltrane at his best, but I think when you come across an artist as consistently great as Coltrane - every bit of material he blows out of that saxophone is something to be cherished - as is this album. Perhaps sparser than some are used to (there's no piano) but your focus should be on that sax anyways and it certainly shines here.

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piano-"less can be more"

john.from.stl

I like the chance to hear Coltrane in a piano-less trio here (tracks 1-3). Sometimes less is more, as they say. Similarly, I've enjoyed Sonny Rollins in this kind of setting (e.g. Freedom Suite; Way Out West). If you dig Lush Life be sure not to miss Soultrane as well (on emusic) for more slow burning Coltrane balladry.

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Something...

Mojo1201

This may not be the best John Coltrane album. But there is just something about this music that I love. Just an odd little jem...

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The Master, Re-Mastered...by Robert Celli

Garaputo

Two words best to describe John Coltrane's 1958 "Lush Life", casual elegance. This newly remastered release on the Prestige label is perfect for an autumn night and a well-mixed cocktail. Coltrane's playing is contemplative and restrained, while still harboring the questing spirituality he would soon begin exploring in subsequent recordings. The absence of a piano player on the first three tracks clears the way for Trane's emotive runs. Tone, pure and bluesy, is the focus on "Lush Life". The last two tracks feature the addition of Red Garland on piano and Donald Byrd on trumpet. At close to 15 minutes the title track hints at some of the more adventurous playing Coltrane would be known for. But this record finds him contented, in all his nuanced glory.

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Lush Life=Sexy

dantelm

Lush Life is a sexy song on its own, but pair it with a winding Coltrane solo and it's mind-blowingly hot.

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Don't do it

AG

As a 'trane junkie all I can say is I'm stunned that this album ranked so high in the emusic poll. This is a pretty tepid effort by his standards. One of the reasons it's so plodding is that the pianist failed to show for one of the sessions used and Prestige was to cheap to re-schedule. If you want to hear some exciting early Coltrane download Soultrane instead. http://www.emusic.com/album/Soultrane-Soultrane-MP3-Download/10589087.html

user avatar

This is what it's all about!!

Biggarthomas

I love this album to bits in fact, I am going to get myself a vinyl version and wear the grooves right down! I can listen to this album at any time of the day any day of the week and not be disappointed. it just gets right inside of my head!

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They Say All Music Guide

Lush Life (1958) is among John Coltrane’s best endeavors on the Prestige label. One reason can easily be attributed to the interesting personnel and the subsequent lack of a keyboard player for the August 16, 1957 session that yielded the majority of the material. Coltrane (tenor sax) had to essentially lead the compact trio of himself, Earl May (bass), and Art Taylor (drums). The intimate setting is perfect for ballads such as the opener “Like Someone in Love.” Coltrane doesn’t have to supplement the frequent redundancy inherent in pianists, so he has plenty of room to express himself through simple and ornate passages. Unifying the slippery syncopation and slightly Eastern feel of “I Love You” is the tenor’s prevalent capacity for flawless, if not downright inspired on-the-spot “head” arrangements that emerge singular and clear, never sounding preconceived. Even at an accelerated pace, the rhythm section ably prods the backbeat without interfering. A careful comparison will reveal that “Trane’s Slo Blues” is actually a fairly evident derivation (or possibly a different take) of “Slowtrane.” But don’t let the title fool you as the mid-tempo blues is undergirded by a lightheartedness. May provides a platform for Coltrane’s even keeled runs before the tenor drops out, allowing both May and then Taylor a chance to shine. The fun cat-and-mouse-like antics continue as Taylor can be heard encouraging the tenor player to raise the stakes and the tempo — which he does to great effect.
The practically quarter-hour reading of Billy Strayhorn’s “Lush Life” is not only the focal point of this album, it is rightfully considered as one of Coltrane’s unqualified masterworks. The performance hails from January 10, 1958 as Coltrane sits in with Red Garland (piano), Donald Byrd (trumpet), Paul Chambers (bass), and Louis Hayes (drums). Coltrane handles the tune’s delicate complexities with infinite style and finesse. Garland similarly sparkles at the 88s, while Byrd’s solo offers a bit of a tonal alternative. It should be noted that the reading here does not include a vocal from Johnny Hartman. That version can be found on the ever imaginatively monikered John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman, Rovi – Lindsay Planer

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