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Funkadelic

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Funkadelic album cover
01
Mommy, What's a Funkadelic?
9:07
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02
I'll Bet You
6:13
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03
Music for My Mother
5:39
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04
I Got a Thing, You Got a Thing, Everybody's Got a Thing
3:56
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05
Good Old Music
8:07
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06
Qualify and Satisfy
6:19
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07
What Is Soul
7:44
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08
Can't Shake It Loose
2:31
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09
I'll Bet You [Single Version]
4:13
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10
Music for My Mother [Single Version]
5:20
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11
As Good as I Can Feel
2:34
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12
Open Our Eyes
4:00
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13
Qualify and Satisfy [Mono Version]
3:02
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14
Music for My Mother [Instrumental 45 Version]
6:14  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 74:59

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

04.22.11
The beginning of the P-Funk empire, and one of the greatest debut albums ever.
Label: Westbound Records / Alpha Pup

It's impossible to overstate how important George Clinton has been to the past four decades of popular music. As a bandleader, conceptualist, producer, frontman, interviewee, songwriter and icon, he's on funk's Mount Rushmore with his avowed models Sly Stone and James Brown and their greatest successor, Prince. On this album he made a dollar out of 15 cents by sublimating his sub-Temptations vocal group, the Parliaments, into a freaked-out band concept that pulled equal inspiration… read more »

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Don't have it? You need it. Bad.

Rustyhooks

IMHO if you are a funk/rock fan - Chili Peppers fans in particular - it should be legislated that you possess every Westbound Records Funkadelic album. Read the reviews. This is a R&R Hall of Fame band for good reason. The intellegence, the humor, the stupidity. It all started right here and yes it is very, very good for your earhole. Dig in.

user avatar

Big Licks

dan00

I thought it was a compilation of Hits, when I first listened to a tape of this album, in 1988. It shows that funk is a spirit that can play around with songs from different genres, in this case swampy, trippy rock blues. Amazing bass, great vocal jamming, some ace melodies and big licks, of innuendo.

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Still relevant today

nilspjohnson

All the themes, rhythms and hooks that make these songs successful are still employed by artists today. This album has something for everyone, like the slow blues tune "Qualify and Satisfy," and funky pop tunes like "As Good as I can Feel." This album is a bit darker and more groove-oriented than their later work. I'm so glad emusic has a lot of stuff by these guys...

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A definative album of its era...

groovelikeuluvparis

This album sums up everything that was good, wacky, spaced out and weird about the late 60s/early 70s funk era (an era which Funkadelic and Westbound labelmates The Ohio Players helped to shape and define). This goes so far beyond the slick psycehdelic soul of Motown, the bluesy Stax sound, and the emerging lush orchestrations of Gamble & Huff that it seems truly from another planet. 70s funk began here in earnest, building on what Sly & James started a few years before. Truly it makes one ask, "Mommy, what's a Funkadelic?!" All you can reply? "I've got a thang, you've got a thang, everybody's got a thang!" RIGHT ON.

user avatar

Psychadelic Funk!

paulc130

More psychadelic than funk, more Hendrix than Brown - but it has the lot thrown in. This has been a favourite of mine for years and the album that got me into Funkadelic. I've had the vinyl version longer than CD's have been available. It's probably not what you've become accustomed to with Funkadelic, but it is so spaced out you'll love it. Highly recommended!

user avatar

funk it up...

Punchcar

A great piece of funk history. Great memories. A small note- "I bet you" was covered very well by The Jackson Five later that year on the 'ABC' LP.

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Mommy whats a funkadelic?

Jellybones

Wow. This right here is a big 'ol hamhock in your cornflakes. Fo real. This early release is probably my favorite, as it mixes in alot of raw blues and rock sound. It relates as much to Hendrix as to James Brown imo, and is ripe with sticky molasses jams and tracks that would be later sampled by countless DJ's. Great job e~Music, you've done it again bringing this incredible collection to your listeners.

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They Say All Music Guide

Funkadelic’s self-titled 1970 debut is one of the group’s best early- to mid-’70s albums. Not only is it laden with great songs — “I’ll Bet You” and “I Got a Thing…” are obvious highlights — but it retains perhaps a greater sense of classic ’60s soul and R&B than any successive George Clinton-affiliated album. Recording for the Detroit-based Westbound label, at the time Funkadelic were in the same boat as psychedelic soul groups such as the Temptations, who had just recorded their landmark Cloud Nine album across town at Motown, and other similar groups. Yet no group had managed to effectively balance big, gnarly rock guitars with crooning, heartfelt soul at this point in time quite like Funkadelic. Clinton’s songs are essentially conventional soul songs in the spirit of Motown or Stax — steady rhythms, dense arrangements, choruses of vocals — but with a loud, overdriven, fuzzy guitar lurking high in the mix. And when Clinton’s songs went into their chaotic moments of jamming, there was no mistaking the Hendrix influence. Furthermore, Clinton’s half-quirky, half-trippy ad libs during “Mommy, What’s a Funkadelic?” and “What Is Soul” can be mistaken for no one else — they’re pure-cut P-Funk. Successive albums portray Funkadelic drifting further toward rock, funk, and eventually disco, especially once Bernie Worrell began playing a larger role in the group. Never again would the band be this attuned to its ’60s roots, making self-titled release a revealing and unique record that’s certainly not short on significance, clearly marking the crossroads between ’60s soul and ’70s funk. [The 2005 reissue features excellent remastered sound, a thick booklet, and bonus tracks pulled from original and scrapped Westbound singles.] – Jason Birchmeier

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