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Dreams Come True - Hi - I Love You Right Heartily Here - New Songs

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Dreams Come True - Hi - I Love You Right Heartily Here - New Songs album cover
Disc 1 of 2
01
That's The Spirit
4:18
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02
I'm Over
3:38
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03
Apocalypse Express
2:48
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04
The Living End
3:01
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05
Things Are Lookin' Up
3:17
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06
The good Ship Omega
3:28
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07
Last Resort
2:33
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08
Till Dreams Come True
3:29
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09
Living End
4:08
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10
I'm Over
4:20
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11
Till Dreams Come True
3:24
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Disc 2 of 2
01
Dead Time Bummer Blues
2:30
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02
Sunnyside Up Luck
5:06
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03
Emerald River Dance
3:10
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04
Waterfall
3:09
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05
North Country
3:12
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06
Farmers Daughter - The Chicken Is In The Garden
1:10
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The Wreck of the FFV - Fast Flying Vestibule
3:13
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500 Miles
2:01
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Oh boy The Magician
5:10
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 20   Total Length: 67:05

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Douglas Wolk

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Douglas Wolk writes about pop music and comic books for Time, the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Wired and elsewhere. He's the author of Reading Comics: How Gra...more »

08.03.06
The last recordings from a supernaturally tender and criminally unsung '70s California singer-songwriter
2005 | Label: Water / The Orchard

Judee Sill never got to finish her third album. By the time the California singer-songwriter recorded the eight songs that open this set (at ex-Monkee Mike Nesmith's studio) in 1974, her career was falling apart; she didn't get around to mixing them before she vanished from music, dying of a drug overdose in 1979. Those last recordings went unheard until Jim O'Rourke completed them in 2004.

They're phenomenal — supernaturally tender meditations on Sill's twin… read more »

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Enchantingly beautiful

YojoaDon

Her voice is angelic and the songs simple. I had never heard of her until I read a book about about the history of rock/pop in Southern Cal. She could have been a big artist if tragedy hadn't hit.

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Mellows me out

AmericanCliche

My favorite tracks off the album are: Apocalypse Express, The Living End and Till Dreams Come True.

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Just beauiful

keith.sweeney

I discovered Judee Sill in 2007, and I couldn't believe that an artist of this talent could have passed me by. Her music is beautiful, Bach meets Joni Mitchell, beautifully arranged with some weird religious imagery in the lyrics. A real original - I urge you to dive in to the catalogue

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Overlooked Diamond

EvilAl

Judee Sill was an overlooked diamond with an extremely tragic story. Her music deserved to be heard 40 years ago. Thanks e-music for giving us a chance now.

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I'm sold...

ronmoses

This is SO not my kind of music. She's got a sort of Judy Collins meets Billy Joel thing going on (well not really but kinda), and there is no reason I should be at all interested in that. But I have to say, she won me over. These songs are beautiful and rich and engaging and I can't stop listening to them. I only grabbed the first eight tracks (that's the unreleased album, the rest is bonus tracks and demos) and I'm just plain hooked.

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eMusic Features

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Six Degrees of Cat Stevens’ Tea for the Tillerman

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Cat Stevens’ Tea for the Tillerman

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

When singer/songwriter Judee Sill died at the age of 35, she had issued two albums under her own name on David Geffen’s Asylum label in 1971 and 1973, respectively. (Both have since been re-released with bonus material by Rhino’s web-only Handmade imprint.) She had another one more or less in the can, recorded in 1974, but it was never finished or released. Her brand of folk music was enigmatic, full of light breeziness, nicely orchestrated (she wrote the charts herself), and drenched in a natural world mysticism that was more ethereal than the standard California fare of the early ’70s. Dreams Come True is that lost third album, produced by Bill Plummer and track engineered by Emitt Rhodes, with the finished mix done by Jim O’Rourke in 2004, 30 years after the album was shelved. Water Records, quickly becoming the obscurantist’s reissue label, has put together a lavishly presented package that houses Dreams Come True, bonus tracks in the form of demos and rehearsals, and a second disc entitled “Lost Songs,” recorded by Tommy Peltier in his home studio and in his living room, which includes nine unreleased tracks and a 12-minute QuickTime movie of Sill performing in concert. The musical — and production — quality on Dreams Come True is high, given that it was recorded in a professional studio. Sill had been fully in possession of her muse when making it. Sill and Art Johnson did the musical charts, and she and Marc McLure arranged the vocals. Those familiar with her first two offerings will find this to be deeper in the vein, fleshed out, more focused. Sill could write hooks as well as she could write words, and these tracks, particularly “That’s the Spirit,” “The Living End,” and “Til Dreams Come True,” are moving emotionally, while not being at all mopey. They are jaunty and full of a sun-drenched airiness that stood out, even when the subject matter — as spiritual as much of it was — was melancholy. Sill never beat a lyric of a tune over the head. Disc two is, naturally, much rougher. This is for the fans, the hardcore devotees who feel there was never enough out there. Some of these tunes have appeared in various guises on the Internet, but these versions are cleaner, though there are almost no credits for the other musicians on the sessions. “Dead Time Bummer Blues” is a fully realized outing, while “Sunny Side Up Luck” is barely a sketch. The stunner on the set is the acoustic home recording of “Emerald River Dance.” Its starkness and unpolished beauty are intoxicating, and give the listener a true portrait of the artist in an intimate environment. The package is lavish — the CDs are in an envelope-folded slipcase and the 72-page book contains interviews with the artist, friends, family, and acquaintances, offering a deeply troubling and even heartbreaking slice of biography that underscores just how remarkable Sill’s music was in lieu of her life circumstances. This is a treasure. – Thom Jurek

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