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The Stan Kenton Story Intermission Riff

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01
Easy Street
3:39
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02
On The Sunny Side Of The Street
3:50
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03
I Surrender Dear
3:27
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04
Begin The Beguine
2:36
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05
Two Moose In A Caboose
3:24
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06
Solitude
3:19
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07
No Baby. Nobody But You
2:43
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08
Tea For Two
2:54
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09
One Twenty
2:45
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10
I Never Thought I'd Sing The Blues
3:01
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11
Shoo Fly Pie And Apple Pan Dowdy
2:37
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12
I Been Down In Texas
3:08
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13
Intermission Riff
3:17
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14
Four Months. Three Weeks. Two Days. One Hour Blues
3:05
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15
Artistry In Boogie
2:59
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16
Come Back To Sorrento
3:06
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17
I Got The Sun In The Morning
3:00
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18
Peg O My Heart
3:35
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19
Come Rain Or Come Shine
3:01
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20
He's Funny That Way
3:14
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21
Ain't No Misery In Me
3:03
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22
Artistry In Percussion
3:14
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23
Safranski
3:09
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24
Artistry In Bolero
3:05
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 24   Total Length: 75:11

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