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The Complete Gus Wildi Recordings

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The Complete Gus Wildi Recordings album cover
Disc 1 of 2
01
East St. Louis Toodle-O
3:29  
02
Creole Love Call
3:48  
03
Stompy Jones
3:53  
04
The Jeep Is Jumpin'
2:27  
05
Jack The Bear
3:21  
06
In A Mellow Tone
2:56  
07
Ko-Ko
2:19  
08
Midriff
3:53  
09
Stomp Look And Listen
2:42  
10
Unbooted Character
4:20  
11
Lonesome Lullaby
3:20  
12
Upper Manhattan Medical Group
3:14  
13
Summertime
2:12  
14
Laura
4:11  
15
I Can't Get Started
4:22  
16
My Funny Valentine
4:46  
17
Everything But You
2:57  
18
Frustration
3:48  
19
Cotton Tail
2:51  
20
Day Dream
3:37  
21
Deep Purple
3:37  
Disc 2 of 2
01
Indian Summer
3:00  
02
Blues
7:04  
03
Rockin' In Rhythm (Bonus Track)
4:31  
04
Black And Tan Fantasy (Bonus Track)
5:12  
05
Stompin' At The Savoy (Bonus Track)
5:06  
06
In The Mood (Bonus Track)
6:02  
07
One O'Clock Jump (Bonus Track)
5:12  
08
Honeysuckle Rose (Bonus Track)
4:19  
09
Happy-Go-Lucky-Local (Bonus Track)
5:35  
10
Flying Home (Bonus Track)
6:09  
11
Body And Soul (Bonus Track)
4:48  
12
It Don't Mean A Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing) (Bonus Track)
10:22  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 33   Total Length: 139:23

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eMusic Features

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It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

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They Say All Music Guide

The Duke Ellington Orchestra captured here was betwixt and between at the time — having exited their Capitol Records contract after an unsatisfying couple of years, the band was back at full strength for the first time since 1951 with the return of Johnny Hodges to the fold, after the latter’s stint running his own band, and moved over to Gus Wildi’s Bethlehem label for two albums, Historically Speaking: The Duke and Duke Ellington Presents, both of which are represented here along with his earlier Ellington ’55 album. Historically Speaking: The Duke, cut in February of 1956, was a look across 30 years of Ellington’s music from 1926 to the present, re-creating the original arrangements with his current band, and is priceless just for the canvas it gives Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance, Jimmy Hamilton, and the others. “Ko-Ko” is worth the price of admission by itself, but juxtaposed with the exquisite “In a Mellow Mood” the disc speaks for itself. Duke Ellington Presents, which was recorded the same month, featured a different soloist on each song, in various contemporary arrangements of enduring pieces such as “Summertime,” “Laura,” and “I Can’t Get Started.” The sound on both sets of sessions is superb, state-of-the-art for 2005 with a very close acoustic and richly detailed, and it’s a great opportunity to hear in a coherent body of work the band that soon re-emerged at the top of its form at the Newport Jazz Festival later that year. The bonus material off of Ellington ’55 also works well in this context, and better than it did on its own. – Bruce Eder

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