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Glory Hope Mountain

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (124 ratings)
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Glory Hope Mountain album cover
01
Hold Your Breath
5:55
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02
Flood
4:24
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03
Even While You're Sleeping
3:39
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04
Crooked Legs
5:09
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05
Glory
4:41
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06
Oh Napoleon
4:15
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07
Low Gravity
3:37
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08
Sister Margaret
2:43
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09
Antenna
3:01
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10
Plateau Ramble
3:07
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11
Flood Pt. 2
3:46
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12
Lullaby (Mountain)
4:18
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 48:35

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Write a Review 7 Member Reviews

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user avatar

lost talking heads album?

doctorbob

to me it sounds like talking heads in a lot of ways. this is not a bad thing. very enjoyable record, highly recommended.

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Yeah Acorn!

topothamornin

Previous reviewers have summed up this fantastic & captivating album to a T so I'm just here to provide more testament that The Acorn have produced one of the best alternative folk albums of 2007. Ps: The last song features the angelic vocals of the sisters from the band Ohbijou, gorgeous!

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Canadian Folk(s)

folkrock75

Great album, in the spirit of the similarly named Akron/Family, The Acorn write textural, acoustic-based jangley folk songs. At times their songs pick up speed and land easily on beat ("Low Gravity", "Antenna") or slow down for quieter, more reserved numbers ("Oh Napoleon", "Sister Margaret"). This sounds great in it's entirety, balancing the overall arrangement into a smoothly flowing composition.

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Squirrels will love The Acorn.

mattbabz

Yes, it's true...The Acorn tracks are smooth and mellow. Melodic Tracks that will get stuck in your bean. Collect all albums for hibernation season. Good Fall > Winter tracks.

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peppered folk

flamgirlant

A lovely and intimate album with warm quiet spots, gurgling feedback, hiccups of electric guitar, gentle tempo changes, tribal-like handclaps and chanting and slowly drawn strings all wrapped in a furry folk blanket. Somehow this album combines the quiet restraint of Califone with the joyous abandon of Akron/Family.

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A most wonderful

ligelowbee

For fans of the Talking Heads, The Weakerthans, and The Rheostatics, you will feel right at home. I can't stop playing it. I was humming Oh Napoleon at work today. Just give it a listen.

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flood

neil8968

listen to flood - awesome track

They Say All Music Guide

Though Canadian bands have seemingly been excelling at just about every form of pop music since the turn of the millennium, it’s the album-length epic where they’ve really been outstanding. Broken Social Scene’s You Forgot It in People, the Arcade Fire’s Funeral, and Wolf Parade’s Apologies to the Queen Mary have been three of the biggest, and the Acorn’s Glory Hope Mountain deserves to take its place beside them. The Ottawa band’s first full-length album after a series of EPs that have attracted increasing attention, Glory Hope Mountain is a good old-fashioned concept album, but an unusually personal one: Glory Hope Mountain is a rough English translation of the name of singer/songwriter Rolf Klausener’s mother, Gloria Esperanza Montoya, and the album is an impressionistic rendering of her life, starting as a destitute orphan in her native Honduras. The impressive thing is that the average listener would never guess that from an initial listen or two: thankfully, there is no ham-handed narrative structure to the album’s lyrics. That said, the incorporation of traditional Honduran folk forms into the arrangements of songs like “Flood” and “Low Gravity” feels completely organic in exactly the way that the Afro-pop affectations of Vampire Weekend’s debut album do not, like a natural outgrowth of the songs and their meaning, not a “hey, this’ll sound cool” add-on. The 12 songs flow beautifully, culminating in the simply gorgeous “Lullaby (Mountain),” a delicate acoustic farewell with Ohbijou’s Casey Mecija’s gentle vocals replacing Klausener’s own. It’s a perfect closer to an ambitious album that fulfills the musical and lyrical goals it sets for itself. – Stewart Mason

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