|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

The Drunken Dance of Modern Man in Love

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (2 ratings)
Retail
Member
The Drunken Dance of Modern Man in Love album cover
01
Prelude/Primer
0:39
$0.49
$0.99
02
Culture Jammer
3:34
$0.49
$0.99
03
A Vague Notion of Nothing Much
3:49
$0.49
$0.99
04
Little Love Affairs
3:25
$0.49
$0.99
05
Gaslight Girl
2:34
$0.49
$0.99
06
Centaurea
4:51
$0.49
$0.99
07
N.E. Brazee
3:46
$0.49
$0.99
08
Faulkner's South
4:24
$0.49
$0.99
09
388 Hate House
1:34
$0.49
$0.99
10
The Love I Fake
4:38
$0.49
$0.99
11
Aubade
3:24
$0.49
$0.99
12
Archipelago No. 12
3:16
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 39:54

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 2 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Dark, beautiful, a tour of back alleys.

NeilTheGray

Like a lot of great albums, this one probably won't stick on the first listen. The production/orchestration is definitely outside the norm, and seems to stick out like a sore thumb at points -- but these oddities are increasingly endearing and engaging with repeated listening. The mood is dark, and his vocals do sound Elliott Smith-esque (including the use of expletives judiciously infrequent enough to make them sting), but I think further comparison doesn't do favors to either artist. Robley is more of a storyteller, and these are not songs of rumination - they are intimate portraits of people, with a highlight on the frailties. And the music has more in common with Beirut or Calexico than with Smith, with touches of Eastern Europe and Americana. I like this as a whole album, but if you're a Smith fan wanting to check out a few tracks, perhaps start with 'Faulkner's South' and 'Culture Jammer' to get a sense...

user avatar

Hit-and-miss, but worth a try

MarkusRTK

Chris Robley sounds here like an overproduced Elliott Smith; his melodic vocal style certainly recalls that late legend, but it's buried underneath a mountain of redundant orchestration and atmospheric studio effects (not to mention brass; oh boy, stay away if you don't like brass). His complex, multisyllabic lyrics are consequently tough to pay attention to, absent the force that a more spare (Smith-style) arrangement would have given. The result: an awkward album that wants to go two directions at once, and generally goes nowhere. Still, when it works, it works: the driving "Culture Jammer" and the beautiful "Archipelago No. 12" are worth a download, as is "Little Love Affairs" if you can handle Robley's affected stutter (I can't) or "Centaurea" if you like swooping Decemberists-style melodrama (I don't).

They Say All Music Guide

A murky, electronic landscape is mapped out at the beginning of The Drunken Dance of Modern Man in Love on “Prelude/Primer,” evoking an orchestra warming up for an evening concert in deep space. It’s a fitting introduction that feeds easily into the strange, surrealistic sound of Chris Robley’s music. “Culture Jammer” features an entrancing electronic backdrop made even more intriguing by the addition of a strange array of horns and banjos along with pervasive percussion. Even Robley’s vocals have been squeezed and entranced by electronic trickery, adding yet another element to the varied soundscape. The wash of sound along with the processed vocals so completely fill the sonic space that it is easy to ignore the lyrics themselves. While it is difficult to predict how a heavily produced album will sound — fresh or over-produced — in six months, Robley, who wrote all the lyrics and music here, has a solid sense of melody and knows how to deliver a catchy hook. This transforms a surrealistic dream like “A Vague Notion of Nothing Much” into a song embedded with a solid sense of popcraft. It is also nice that Robley can switch from the big sound of “Little Love Affairs” to a mellow instrumental like “Gaslight Girl” before delving into a ballad like “Centaurea.” The Drunken Dance of Modern Man in Love is an unusual, evocative album, both musically varied and tuneful. – Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr.

more »