|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Live At Carnegie Hall Dec, 11, 1943

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (2 ratings)
Retail
Member
Live At Carnegie Hall Dec, 11, 1943 album cover
Disc 1 of 2
01
Star Spangeld Banner
1:36
$0.49
$0.99
02
Introduction
1:04
$0.49
$0.99
03
Take The A Train
3:18
$0.49
$0.99
04
Moon Mist
3:37
$0.49
$0.99
05
Tea For Two
3:00
$0.49
$0.99
06
Honeysuckle Rose
3:46
$0.49
$0.99
07
Star Dust
4:41
$0.49
$0.99
08
C Jam Blues
4:42
$0.49
$0.99
09
West Indian Influence
3:20
$0.49
$0.99
10
Lighter Attitude
4:00
$0.49
$0.99
11
New World A-Coming
14:10  
12
Floor Shows
3:50
$0.49
$0.99
13
Don't Get Around Much Any more
4:22
$0.49
$0.99
Disc 2 of 2
01
Introduction
0:40
$0.49
$0.99
02
Ring Dem Bells
2:53
$0.49
$0.99
03
Award Winning Compositons
6:40
$0.49
$0.99
04
Jack The Bear
3:43
$0.49
$0.99
05
Do Nothing Till You Hear From Me
3:19
$0.49
$0.99
06
Sumnertime
3:59
$0.49
$0.99
07
Cotton Tail
3:50
$0.49
$0.99
08
Black And Tan Fantasy
5:56
$0.49
$0.99
09
Rockin In Rhythm
5:16
$0.49
$0.99
10
Sentimental Lady
3:52
$0.49
$0.99
11
Trumpet In Spades
4:45
$0.49
$0.99
12
Things Ain't What They Used To Be
6:08
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 25   Total Length: 106:27

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 0 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

eMusic Features

1

Six Degrees of Duke Ellington’s Money Jungle

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

Six Degrees of Duke Ellington’s Money Jungle

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Thelonious Monk’s Genius of Modern Music, Vol. 2

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Thelonious Monk’s Genius of Modern Music, Vol. 2

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of A Love Supreme

By Britt Robson, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of A Love Supreme

By Britt Robson, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Music in a Hurry: Standard Transcriptions

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

When the Roots signed on as Jimmy Fallon's Late Night house band, there was a curious catch: NBC wouldn't be paying for the rights to any music, not even the band's own. Consequently. the Roots had to compose dozens of new pieces for on-air use. The upside: those pieces needed only be long enough to play the show in and out of commercials, or to accompany guests from the wings to the desk. Everything old becomes… more »

0

The Not Necessarily Happy Horns of Clark Terry

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Can a musician's reputation be harmed by the persistent paying of a compliment? Clark Terry has a warm, plump, utterly distinctive sound on trumpet and its chubby pal the flugelhorn. He's rhythmically assured at any tempo, and has a deep feeling for the blues. But some writers fixate on how he has "the happiest sound in jazz," as if one trait defines his art. To be fair, it's not a rep he's run away from, having… more »

0

Chris McGregor: Cape Town to Free Town

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It wasn't easy, being the interracial Blue Notes in 1963 apartheid South Africa: a black horns-and-rhythm combo with a white pianist/music director, Chris McGregor. They skipped out of Cape Town the following year: went to a French festival and didn't return. In London by '65, the quintet's members were welcomed by forward-looking jazz musicians: Steve Lacy drafted bassist Johnny Dyani and drummer Louis Moholo for the album The Forest and the Zoo, and an ill-fated… more »