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The Duke Box

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The Duke Box album cover
Disc 1 of 8
01
East St, Louis Toodle-Oo
1:07
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Me And You
2:43
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Grievin'
3:40
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Little Posey
2:54
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My Last Goodbye
3:19
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The Gal From Joe's
3:36
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Tootin Through The Roof
4:57
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Day In, Day Out
4:16
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Merry-Go-Round
2:26
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East St, Louis Toodle-Oo
1:09
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Ko Ko
2:25
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Blue Goose
3:18
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So Far, So Good
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Cotton Tail
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Concerto Fro Cootie
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Jack The Bear
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Boy Meets Horn
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The Sergeant Was Shy
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Never No Lament
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Disc 2 of 8
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It's Glory
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The Mooche
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The Sheik Of Araby
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Sepia Panorama
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Ko Ko
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There Shall Be No Night
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Pussy Willow
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Chatterbox
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Mood Indigo
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Harlem Airshaft
3:42
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Ferryboat Serenade
1:34
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Warm Valley
3:36
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Stompy Jones
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Chloe
4:03
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Bojangles
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On The Air
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Rumpus In Richmond
2:36
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Chaser
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The Sidewalks Of New York
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The Flaming Sword
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Never No Lament
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Caravan
3:44
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Clarinet Lament
3:28
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Disc 3 of 8
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Slap Happy
3:24
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Sepia Panorama
5:12
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Boy Meets Horn
5:36
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Way Down Yonder In New Orleans
1:28
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Oh Babe, Maybe Someday
2:17
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Five O'Clock Whistle
2:01
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Fanfare
0:35
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Call Of The Canyon
1:35
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Rockin' In Rhythm
4:52
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Sophisticated Lady
5:11
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Cotton Tail
3:07
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Whispering Grass
2:30
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Conga Brava
4:07
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I Never Felt This Way Before
5:31
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Across The Track Blue
6:44
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Honeysuckle Rose
5:08
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Wham
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Star Dust
4:16
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Rose Of The Rio Grande
3:34
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St. Louis Blues
5:39
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Warm Valley
0:51
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God Bless America
0:28
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Disc 4 of 8
01
Take The A Train
0:40
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Hayfoot Strawfoot
2:36
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It Can't Be Wrong
3:02
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What Am I Here For?
3:35
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Mainstem A.K.A. Altitude
3:07
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Could It Be You?
2:51
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Goin' Up
3:45
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Don't Get Around Much Anymore
3:48
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Nevada
2:42
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Tnings Ain't What They Used To Be
1:05
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Take The A Train
0:46
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Don't Get Around Much Anymore
4:01
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Mainstem A.K.A. Altitude
3:00
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I Don't Want Anybody At All
3:12
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Johnny Come Lately
2:51
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Things Ain't What They Used To Be
0:37
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Moon Mist
2:59
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You'll Never Know
3:08
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Tonight I Shall Sleep
3:35
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I Don't What Kind Of Blues I Got
3:23
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Don't Get Around Much Anymore
4:31
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Moon Mist
0:39
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Introduction
0:26
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I Wonder Why
3:03
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Goin' Up
3:44
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Disc 5 of 8
01
Star Spangled Banner
1:37
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Introduction
1:03
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Take The A Train
3:18
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Moon Mist
3:37
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05
Tea For Two
3:00
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Honeysuckle Rose
3:46
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Star Dust
4:42
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C Jam Blues
4:42
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West Indian Influence
3:20
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Lighter Attitude
3:59
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New World A-Coming
14:11  
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Floor Show
3:50
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Don't Get Around Much Anymore
4:22
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Disc 6 of 8
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Introduction
0:41
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Ring Dem Bells
2:54
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Medley
6:40
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Jack The Bear
3:42
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Do Nothing Till You Hear From Me
3:19
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Summertime
3:59
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Cotton Tail
3:50
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Black And Tan Fantasy
5:56
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Rockin' In Rhythm
5:16
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Sentimental Lady
3:52
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Trumpet In Spaces
4:45
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Things Ain't What They Used To Be
5:10
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Introduction
0:35
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G.I. Jive
1:40
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Amor, Amor
2:32
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Frankie And Johnny
2:59
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Disc 7 of 8
01
Take The A Train
0:45
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Suddenly It Jumped
2:50
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Laura
3:05
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04
Kissing Bug
3:16
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Stompy Jones
3:54
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Solid Old Man
3:20
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Carnegie Blues
3:01
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08
In A Mellotone
3:01
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Fancy Dan
4:15
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Things Ain't What They Used To Be
1:02
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11
Black And Tan Fantasy
2:17
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Mood To Be Wooed
4:56
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13
Frantic Fatnasy
5:11
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C Jam Blues
2:47
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Air Conditioned Jungle
4:45
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On The Sunny Side Of The Street
4:33
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Rockin' In Rhythm
4:50
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18
Take The A Train
0:41
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The Blues
7:28
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Sono
5:24
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Disc 8 of 8
01
Solid Old Man
3:27
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Singin' In The Rain
6:06
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Three Cent Stomp
4:07
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04
Tulip Or Turnip
3:00
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Take The A Train
8:15
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Hy'a Sue
3:53
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C Jam Blues
3:23
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Passion Flower
4:12
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Clementine
2:59
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Just A-Sittin' And A-Rockin'
3:17
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11
One O'Clock Jump
1:57
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Unbooted Character
4:59
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Paradise
4:48
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How You Sound
4:15
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It's Monday Every Day
3:16
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Caravan
5:16
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Cotton Tail
3:45
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 155   Total Length: 535:14

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eMusic Features

1

Six Degrees of Duke Ellington’s Money Jungle

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Thelonious Monk’s Genius of Modern Music, Vol. 2

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of A Love Supreme

By Britt Robson, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Music in a Hurry: Standard Transcriptions

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

When the Roots signed on as Jimmy Fallon's Late Night house band, there was a curious catch: NBC wouldn't be paying for the rights to any music, not even the band's own. Consequently. the Roots had to compose dozens of new pieces for on-air use. The upside: those pieces needed only be long enough to play the show in and out of commercials, or to accompany guests from the wings to the desk. Everything old becomes… more »

0

The Not Necessarily Happy Horns of Clark Terry

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Can a musician's reputation be harmed by the persistent paying of a compliment? Clark Terry has a warm, plump, utterly distinctive sound on trumpet and its chubby pal the flugelhorn. He's rhythmically assured at any tempo, and has a deep feeling for the blues. But some writers fixate on how he has "the happiest sound in jazz," as if one trait defines his art. To be fair, it's not a rep he's run away from, having… more »

0

Chris McGregor: Cape Town to Free Town

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It wasn't easy, being the interracial Blue Notes in 1963 apartheid South Africa: a black horns-and-rhythm combo with a white pianist/music director, Chris McGregor. They skipped out of Cape Town the following year: went to a French festival and didn't return. In London by '65, the quintet's members were welcomed by forward-looking jazz musicians: Steve Lacy drafted bassist Johnny Dyani and drummer Louis Moholo for the album The Forest and the Zoo, and an ill-fated… more »

They Say All Music Guide

During the 1940s, the Duke Ellington and Count Basie orchestras were the medulla oblongata in the central nervous system of jazz throughout the United States of America. The evolution of Duke’s unparalleled orchestra during that very transitional decade is etched in commercially issued phonograph records; when the listener is able to follow this progress using lesser-known air check acetates and hand-made field recordings, the plot thickens as tempos relax and soloists are allowed more space for improvisation. It’s a lot like hearing the music live through a large antique radio full of bulbous vacuum tubes with orange filaments aglow. Storyville’s eight-CD Duke Box is a treasure chest of live location and broadcast studio performances originally preserved for posterity on privately produced platters and radio transcription discs. Announcers pop up everywhere — even in the studios — and some of them garble song titles or blab right over the music. Alistair Cooke even narrates a “staged rehearsal” as if covering a cricket match. It’s an invaluable lesson in the combined histories of jazz and radio.
For those who crave such information, here’s a quick rundown of dates and locations. On January 9, 1940 the band broadcast over NBC from the Southland, a venue at 76 Warrenton Street in Boston, MA variously described as Café, Casino and Ballroom. On June 10, 1940 they broadcast from the CBS Studios in New York. On November 7, 1940 the Ellington orchestra played the Crystal Ballroom in Fargo, ND; the music played on that night was captured on a portable recording unit using 78 rpm discs. On April 3 and 4, as well as on June 6, 1943, Duke’s band played the Hurricane Club in Times Square at Broadway and West 51st Street. On December 8, 1943, Ellington’s orchestra entertained armed forces personnel at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, VA; three days later they gave a full-length concert at Carnegie Hall. On July 8, 1944, Duke took his band to the Naval Training Center in Bainbridge, MD. A performance in the New Zanzibar at West 49th and Broadway in New York City was recorded on September 26, 1945. In a rather unusual set of circumstances, Duke Ellington and his orchestra performed a contrived rehearsal at New York’s World Studios on August 3, 1945; with announcements by Alistair Cooke, this material was broadcast only once, over the BBC network, on December 28, 1945. This stunning collection of uncommon recordings ends with live broadcasts from the Howard Theatre in Washington D.C. on April 20, 1946 and the Hollywood Empire Ballroom in Los Angeles during February 1949. Proof again that Duke Ellington spent most of his life on the road. – arwulf arwulf

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