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Stereo Rodeo

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Stereo Rodeo album cover
01
Dance In the Middle
4:51
$0.49
02
Suspicious Minds
5:06
$0.49
03
Weary Bones
3:37
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04
Bad Son
3:19
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05
Give Grace
5:50
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06
Driving One
2:27
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07
Stereo Rodeo
3:57
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08
Driving Two
1:53
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09
Animals Love Touch
3:15
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10
Garbage Man
4:23
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11
Crucible Glow
4:04
$0.49
Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 42:42

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Stereo Rodeo

EMUSIC-01DF0646

Rusted Root is back! It's been 7 years since we've gotten brand new studio material from Rusted Root, and this album is worth the wait! Michael has recently been quoted as saying how much he hates being labeled in a certain "genre" and this album shows many different aspects of Rusted Root's music. All of them are very Root at heart, and have that jamming feel. It's all about the music here, and they really connect. Dance in the Middle is my favorite. Keeps me movin' & groovin'! But don't rule out the cinematic feel of Stereo Rodeo or the new Latin beat to the only cover on the album, Suspicious Minds. ROCK On Root. Rock on.

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They Say All Music Guide

Stereo Rodeo is Rusted Root’s first studio album in seven years — a long stretch of time by any measure but especially long for a group who at its heart is a working band, earning its audience by constant performances. Constant performances should lead to regular recordings, but not for Rusted Root in the new millennium, who released not a single collection of new material since the attempted pop crossover of 2002′s Welcome to My Party. Stereo Rodeo has elements of that shiny gloss, but there’s a heavy emphasis on their elastic worldbeat grooves which, more than ever, seem indebted to latter-day Talking Heads, only minus the esoteric egghead bent. Rusted Root still lean toward crowd-pleasing jams — clearly evident on their slow take of Elvis’ “Suspicious Minds,” but also on their lengthy groove-oriented cuts where mood supersedes hooks, something that is a bit of a Rusted Root trademark. So in that sense, Stereo Rodeo could be seen as a correction or a tacit apology for the pop inclinations of Welcome to My Party, a way to get the band back to their roots without drawing attention to any machinations that get them there. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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