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World Trade Center

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World Trade Center album cover
01
World Trade Center Cello Theme
Artist: Craig Armstrong;Alison Lawrance
3:43
 
02
World Trade Center Piano Theme
Artist: Craig Armstrong
4:01
 
03
New York Awakes
Artist: Craig Armstrong
2:30
 
04
The Drive Downtown
Artist: Craig Armstrong
3:52
 
05
Rise Above The Towers
Artist: Craig Armstrong
2:26
 
06
World Trade Center Choral Piece
Artist: Craig Armstrong;Susie Stevens Logan
2:41
 
07
John & Donna Talk About Their Family
Artist: Craig Armstrong
1:25
 
08
Ethereal
Artist: Craig Armstrong
5:25
 
09
John's Woodshed
Artist: Craig Armstrong
1:39
 
10
Marine Arrives At Ground Zero
Artist: Craig Armstrong
2:57
 
11
Will and Allison in the Hospital
Artist: Craig Armstrong
1:54
 
12
Allison At The Stoplight
Artist: Craig Armstrong
1:08
 
13
Jimeno Sees Jesus
Artist: Craig Armstrong
1:43
 
14
John and Will Found / Will Ascends
Artist: Craig Armstrong
5:05
 
15
John's Apparition
Artist: Craig Armstrong
2:31
 
16
John Rescued / Resolution
Artist: Craig Armstrong
7:47
 
17
Elegy
Artist: Craig Armstrong
4:39
 
18
Ethereal Piano Coda
Artist: Craig Armstrong
2:09
 
Album Information
ALBUM ONLY

Total Tracks: 18   Total Length: 57:35

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They Say All Music Guide

Scottish composer Craig Armstrong (Love Actually, Ray, The Quiet American) infuses director Oliver Stone’s World Trade Center with all of the dread, sorrow, respect, and unity that the subject deserves. Like John Powell’s tasteful and quiet score for the similarly themed United 93, Armstrong has chosen to let the story provide the power, painting slow swaths of quiet melancholy with piano, cello, and choir over images of brutality, despair, and hope, much like Stone’s use of Samuel Barber’s Adagio for Strings in his 1986 Academy Award-winning rendering of the Vietnam War, Platoon. Armstrong’s subtle use of electronics and acoustic guitar helps to ground the more traditional classical elements of the score, providing a window into 2001 without opening it all the way. This is desperation at its most elegant and elegance at its most desperate. – James Christopher Monger

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