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Car Alarm

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (107 ratings)
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Car Alarm album cover
01
Aerial
4:21
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02
A Fuller Moon
4:11
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03
On a Letter
3:48
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04
CMS Sequence
1:08
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05
Car Alarm
3:19
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06
Weekend
2:45
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07
New Schools
3:36
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08
Window Sills
3:46
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09
Down in the City
3:28
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10
Pages
4:00
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11
The Staircase
3:02
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12
Mirrors
1:37
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 39:01

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

07.24.09
Fifteen years into a consistent career brings a major highlight
Label: Thrill Jockey

Chicago's Sea And Cake have clocked in 15 years and seven previous albums of jazz and world-inflected art-pop — the kind of muso-indie, Smiths-influenced thing that has only found a (relatively) mainstream American audience recently with the emergence of Vampire Weekend. But the band's eighth album is the least self-consciously clever of their career, and is, by some distance, their best.

The rhythm section of legendary Tortoise leader John McEntire and bassist (and talented painter)… read more »

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Deutschehund

This is a disappointing outing for the Sea and Cake. To me, they've finally crossed the line into light adult contemporary music. Check out the albums from the mid to late 90s to hear the intensity this band once had. Once you start hearing the electronic flourishes, this band starts going downhill.

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They Say All Music Guide

Released 17 months after Everybody, a mere blink of an eye for this group of Renaissance men, Car Alarm represents an attempt by the Sea and Cake to be a working band — for what may be the last time, what with family obligations to place among the vast array of outside interests. The album was written in a burst just after returning from an Australian tour, and recorded in a fairly quick span as well. The results seem to have refreshed this band of post-rock stalwarts, who may never need (or desire) a radical shift in sound, but should have already easily fallen prey to laziness — an album where the adjective “workmanlike” becomes an insult rather than a compliment. Their brisk, efficient indie rock hasn’t changed radically, but the insertion of an instrumental here and an electronics-heavy track there makes for needed counterpoint. The individual members of the quartet are still nearly telepathic in their group interplay; John McEntire’s drums set the tone for each song while Eric Claridge’s bass anchors the lower register, and the twin guitars of Sam Prekop and Archer Prewitt scope out the higher frequencies. – John Bush

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