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Album 1700

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Album 1700 album cover
01
Roling Home
3:32
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02
Leaving On A Jet Plane
3:31
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03
Weep For Jamie
4:12
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04
No Other Name
2:31
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05
The House Song
4:19
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06
The Great Mandella (The Wheel Of Life)
4:45
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07
I Dig Rock And Roll Music
2:34
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08
If I Had Wings
2:22
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09
I'm In Love With A Big Blue Frog
2:09
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10
Whatshername
3:27
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11
Bob Dylan's Dream
4:02
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12
The Song Is Love
2:44
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 40:08

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don't know what era these other posters grew up in

WVMMRH

but the artists they mention here were NOT what was being heard on a.m.radio which at the time was 'the thing'..what was being heard was the blues magoos,the association,iron butterfly,vanilla fudge,jon (abnor)and robin and the incrowd,,the five americans,the hollies,etc...PP&M were NOT being played on the same stations as the likes of Fairport Convention,only select nilsson songs were being played on a.m. radio,like "without you" and..well.."without you"...PP&M weren't being played on the stations that introduced king crimson ,it's a beautiful day,etc,so posters please don't catagorise them in the same lot as fairport convention and van dyke parks..and nico's Chelsea girl?? good grief.1700 and it did well,..but well can also mean(as in this case) not so much 'good' but just 'different'..Personlly I'd purchase psychedelic lollipop or jon and robin's "the soul of a boy and girl"abnak records,1967) before I'd buy 1700..actually i did...

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Richie Misses It

banbointe

Richie was, what, 5 years old when this album came out. With exactly what "contemporary trends" does he imagine PP&M were out of sync? Looking back at that period, I see an explosion of creativity and diversity - a golden age of a kind. Warner Brothers was an AMAZING label under the guidance of Mo Ostin and Lenny Waronker. You'd be hard pressed to find an INDIE label today with a similar breadth and diversity - and they weren't alone. So to which 1967 is Unterberger referring? The year that saw the release of the first Fairport Convention album? The year of Nico's "Chelsea Girl"? The year of the Jim Kweskin Jug Band, Harry Nilsson and Van Dyke Parks? To me Album 1700 is a terrific mish-mosh of styles and ideas that were in the air in 1967 and perfectly of a piece with its time. Beyond that, though, it is a terrific album - and that's really the main point. PP&M were at the top of their game and - song after song - it is a rousing good listen.

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Richie Unterberger missed it

mikesull

Despite the clueless music guide review above this is clearly one of their best albums. Pure magic to those of us who were there and in tune with the wonderful kaleidoscope of music being created in the mid 60s.

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They Say All Music Guide

For a 1967 album that managed to yield a number one hit single and an additional Top Ten smash, Album 1700 was pretty out of sync with contemporary trends. This is not exactly a rock record, but the trio was unquestionably making more use of backup musicians and arrangements that owed a bit to pop/rock. (Paul Butterfield, Paul Winter, Canadian rock band the Paupers, and top New York folk-rock session musicians Paul Griffin, Russ Savakus, and Harvey Brooks all play on the record.) They never did sound too comfortable with that form, but at least they didn’t sound as uncomfortable as they had in the past. The material was an uneven mixture of passably pleasant original tunes covering light comedy and social/philosophical commentary, including an honest to God folk-rock cover of Eric Andersen’s “Rolling Home,” albeit with the pure folk harmonies of their early days unchanged; a Bob Dylan cover (“Bob Dylan’s Dream”) that could have easily fit onto a PPM album early in their career; and, perhaps to make sure there was one song for the toddler when it was played in the family living room, the positively embarrassing “I’m in Love With a Big Blue Frog.” “I Dig Rock and Roll Music,” though it made the Top Ten, was not a wholehearted embrace of the new rock sounds, coming off as a rather savage and strange parody of the Mamas & the Papas. The album’s ace in the hole was the melodic and slightly maudlin “Leaving on a Jet Plane,” an early John Denver composition that would became a number one smash in late 1969, two years after the LP’s release. – Richie Unterberger

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