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All Delighted People EP

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All Delighted People EP album cover
01
All Delighted People (Original Version)
11:40  
02
Enchanting Ghost
3:42
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03
Heirloom
2:57
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04
From The Mouth Of Gabriel
4:05
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05
The Owl And The Tanager
6:41
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06
All Delighted People (Classic Rock Version)
8:09
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07
Arnika
5:16
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08
Djohariah
17:03  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 8   Total Length: 59:33

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

J. Edward Keyes

Editor-in-Chief

Joe Keyes writes about music.

08.23.10
Sufjan Stevens, All Delighted People EP
Label: Asthmatic Kitty Records / SC Distribution

The first proper collection of Sufjan Stevens songs in five years starts small: just Stevens's voice trembling over a gently lowing choir. It gets bigger eventually, adding strings and horns and timpani and gradually expanding to an 11-minute opus that takes on American superficiality while extensively quoting Simon & Garfunkel. How's that for a comeback?

Stevens always had a thing for grand entrances. He owned the early part of the '00s owing mostly to two… read more »

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Yes I'm delighted!

Siepie

"All Delighted People" gives me the chicken pox over and over and over, each time I listen to it. What a song. And also the rest of the material is great. According to my humble opinion, this EP is even better than The Age of Adz. 5 stars!

user avatar

Great slice of Sufjan

DirkS.

This is one of my favorites of Sufjan. I know it's only an EP, but I find myself putting this one on and letting play through just as much as the two "State Albums". There's a nice mix of "electronic experimental" Sufjan and his more singer/songwriter stuff. Love both versions of "All delighted people" and "Heirloom", "Enchanted Ghost" and "The Owl and the Tanager" are stand outs and some of his best work as far as I'm concerned. I don't know why so many Sufjan Stevens fans are so critical of his different ventures, but this is great.

user avatar

Overwrought

Thumpdiggity

Sufjan Stevens is undoubtedly a very talented songwriter and musician. But he got carried on this album, and we end up with too much of everything. I'm still waiting for something as good as "Illinoise".

user avatar

Weak vocal performances

jeffylopezstuit

I'd find this recording much more listenable if Stevens had written his vocal parts in a range he could sing well in. On my first listen to the title track, I wondered to myself "who is that horrible whiny lead singer he's got now", before I realized it was him! Weak vocal performances throughout made for unsatisfying listening.

user avatar

Are you deaf?

Ellsinator

To the dude who asked where the songs are...Are you deaf? Yeah, there's some electronic noise on here. However, there are strong songs at the core, just like there always has been on Sufjan's stuff. I can understand the criticism people bring about some of his stuff being noisy and electronic drivel. But not this stuff. Compare this to Adz and it's the better of the two records this year and it's because the songs are more prominent. Adz is hard to get through because of the schizophrenic stuff flying everywhere. But even on that, the songs are there. Not so on this EP. If you can't hear it then you probably don't get it. Sorry for your unfortunate hearing loss.

user avatar

Transcendent

bushwick_mark

It's been a while since I've listened to an album over and over. With the immense amount of music immediately available, my normal urge is to sample everything. But I keep coming back to the this album to explore it's nuances of musicality and poetry. The references to Simon and Garfunkle are poignant and intelligent, and re-exploration of the Americana that S&G delved into 40 years ago.

user avatar

Lots of noise but no songs

mark_l_nicholson

Someone already said it here - where are the songs? Where are songs like Romulus, Chicago, Casimir Pulaski Day? There aren't any that I can find and unfortunately I just downloaded The Age of Adz and it's more of the same drivel. He seems to have take a cue from preachers who when they don't have a good message they compensate by preaching two or three. Without any good songs he's giving us 60 minute EP's of fluff.

user avatar

Nice!

Geo529

This is a great effort yet again by Sufjan. For some reason the horns in All Delighted People remind me of some older Pink Floyd work.

user avatar

Dont Know Why

MusicalOmnivore

so many people love this guy. some of the music is creative but his thin whiney voice is too much for me to take. If I had to choose between great and horrible I'd definitely choose the latter but my real opinion would be somewhere in the middle.

user avatar

my god !!

pkdick67

i couldn't think he could go beyond illinoise , but he did . Djohariah is a marvel for my ears, goosebumps all over right now as i listen.. and the drum machine at the end i can only hope is heralding the proper album coming next month ( it is said to be electronic),.. but what more can we expect after this ?

eMusic Features

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Member Poll: Favorite 2010 Albums

By eMusic Members, Contributor

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They Say All Music Guide

At sixty minutes, Sufjan Stevens’ All Delighted People hardly qualifies as an EP, but the enigmatic, indie pop superstar has never been one to stick with the format. Book-ended by two distinct versions of the considerable title cut (eleven and eight minutes long, respectively), which is a self-described “dramatic homage to the Apocalypse, existential ennui, and Paul Simon’s ‘The Sounds of Silence,” the eight-track set proves successful in melding Stevens’ precious indie folk with the circular, avant/electro-classical persona he adopted for 2009’s ambitious BQE. As per usual, the record is immaculately crafted, but a bit “proggy,” which could serve to disappoint listeners who have been waiting patiently for the artist to return to the engaging, patchwork pop/rock of 2005’s Illinoise. Fans of the quirky, less immediate moments from that album will find a great deal to love on this precursor to October’s full length Age of Adz, but the emotionally charged, collegiate/spiritual nostalgia that informed his earlier works has all but dissipated. – James Christopher Monger

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