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To Bring You My Love

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (206 ratings)
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To Bring You My Love album cover
01
To Bring You My Love
5:34
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02
Meet Ze Monsta
3:29
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03
Working For The Man
4:49
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04
C'mon Billy
2:51
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05
Teclo
4:58
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06
Long Snake Moan
5:15
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07
Down By The Water
3:15
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08
I Think I'm A Mother
4:03
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09
Send His Love To Me
4:21
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10
The Dancer
4:06
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 42:41

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

11.16.10
An astonishing document of female sexuality and all its contradictions
1995 | Label: ISLAND RECORDS

Like its studio predecessor Rid of Me, To Bring You My Love fades in slowly and deliberately, a menacing single-string guitar riff serving as the entr'acte to PJ Harvey's despondent growl, which is placed so up-front in the mix that it sounds distorted beyond repair. The funereal atmosphere of the first track, in which Harvey growls and then wails over the tribulations she has gone through in order to be with a lover, sets the… read more »

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