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Darkness At Noon

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (95 ratings)
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Darkness At Noon album cover
01
Laughter In The Dark
7:55
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02
The Moon Under Water
3:59
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03
The Water Under The Moon
3:52
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04
A Black And White Rainbow
4:59
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05
For Slavoj
4:58
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06
Europa
3:50
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07
Pastelka On The Train
3:13
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08
Goodbye Great Britain
1:34
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09
Our Lady Of The Vlatva
1:36
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10
Wicky Pocky
5:08
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11
Portlandtown
5:17
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 46:21

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Hawk + Hacksaw

odrapol

I've long been a fan of Neutral Milk Hotel & Jeremy Barnes' voice. A Hawk and A Hacksaw was a surprise at first due to the minimal amount of vocals in most song, but after a couple of listens it's become an album that I've listened to over and over.

user avatar

Gypsy-a-Go-Go

sketchE

In the vein of Devotchka and Beirut but without the throaty vocals, this beautiful album is all about the music. If you have someone to dance with, you will. If you don't, you can dance around in circles and pretend the caravan is coming to get you.Good stuff.

user avatar

SO WHY IS THIS "ELECTRONIC" MUSIC?

Robotclaw

Same reason Joseph Spence is classified as "reggae" here at eMusic, I guess. But no matter what you call it, it's a wonderful sound. i hope eMusic soon makes The Way the Wind Blows available.

user avatar

Lovely Music

Fabricari

This is a wonderful album. If you like Neutral Milk Hotel or The Decemberists, you will love it. I know ITunes marks this as Electronic, but the end result is a very organic rich sound blasting through the speakers taking you to a time when there was more to be imagined. Ehn, I don't know what I'm saying. All I know is that this is passionate music.

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Joshua Glazer(AMG)=Cynical Deaf Person

corby

Short attention spanned individuals should not be given an opportunity to write about meaningful/interesting/beuatiful/fucking-music.,

eMusic Features

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Six Degrees of Beirut’s The Rip Tide

By Peter Margasak, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Beirut’s The Rip Tide

By Peter Margasak, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

On his second release as A Hawk and a Hacksaw, Neutral Milk Hotel’s Jeremy Barnes continues to play the antique card, now focusing on the “ompah” accordion sound of an 18th century European village, as opposed to the Reconstruction-era American village of his previous effort. Of course, just because Barnes evokes a certain time and place doesn’t mean his hectic musical ear stays in that one place, hence the squeezebox that morphs into a battery of bagpipes on the highly cinematic opener, “Laughter in the Dark.” There’s also room for a prideful horn that echoes the work of Ennio Morricone and the constant pitter-patter of castanets and marching snares that ensure that the solemn moments like “For Slavoj” and “Europa” don’t stay that way for too long. The other notable change from the self-titled debut is the absence of digital interference. On the first album, Barnes threw his vintage sounds into a modern wormhole with much sampler stutter. On Darkness at Noon, he keeps the computerization well in the back, invisible to the ears. Or perhaps the ten-deep list of musicians on the CD sleeve means it was a full battalion of players tapping, blowing, squeezing, and strumming away all at once. Imagine that. – Joshua Glazer

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