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When the Night Is New

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (7 ratings)
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When the Night Is New album cover
01
But Beautiful
6:26
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02
East of the Sun
5:34
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03
The Very Thought Of You
3:33
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04
You Don't Know What Love Is
4:19
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05
The Thrill Is Gone
3:35
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06
If I Should Lose You
3:56
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07
It Might As Well Be Spring
6:55
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08
I Didn't Know What Time It Was
3:18
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09
Left Alone
4:54
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10
Just One Of Those Things
4:46
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11
I Was Brought To My Senses
6:18
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12
I'll Be Seeing You
2:47
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 56:21

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They Say All Music Guide

With the growing volume of female jazz vocalists putting out new CDs every year, it is hard for each of them to catch sufficient media attention. But Abigail Riccards’ debut recording avoids the typical mistakes many of them make. Gifted with a warm, expressive voice and clear diction, she chose material that fit her well, in addition to hiring talented arrangers and seasoned musicians. Several standards are well conceived. “But Beautiful” is a stunning opener, initially setting itself up as a dreamy ballad, but detouring into a driving solo by pianist/arranger David Berkman before the singer returns to add a wordless vocal, with flugelhornist Ron Horton and Adam Kolker (on bass clarinet) adding to the lush backdrop. “East of the Sun” has practically become a requirement for singers and Riccards takes liberties with the melody without losing sight of it. Portions of “The Very Thought of You” add a soft African vamp, with bassist Ben Allison suggesting the sound of an African thumb piano. She’s equally at home with a groovy take of “The Thrill Is Gone,” in which Berkman plays a bit of uncredited organ. Riccards sizzles with the help of Allison and drummer Matt Wilson, who set up “If I Could Lose You” and eventually add Lage Lund’s sinewy guitar. The Caribbean mood prominent in “It Might As Well Be Spring” provides a wild contrast with Riccards’ relatively straight-ahead rendition of its lyrics. But Riccards especially proves her depth as an interpreter by her dramatic take of “Left Alone,” a gem co-written by Billie Holiday and her pianist, Mal Waldron. If there is a weak spot in this laudable CD, it is Riccards’ inclusion of rocker Sting’s ballad “I Was Brought to My Senses”: it begins well enough, but its repetitious theme and mediocre lyrics don’t measure up to her other selections. But one ill-fitting track does not undo the magic of an outstanding debut effort by the promising jazz vocalist Abigail Riccards. – Ken Dryden

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