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Live in Japan

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (21 ratings)
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Live in Japan album cover
01
Listen Here!
5:37
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02
Tired Man
5:12
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03
If Trouble Was Money
8:17
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04
Jealous Man
3:44
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05
Stormy Monday
9:34
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06
Skatin'
3:37
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07
All About My Girl
6:51
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Album Information
LIVE

Total Tracks: 7   Total Length: 42:52

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ALBERT COLLINS IS STILL ONE OF THE BEST

rdblues

DEFINETLY MORE FUNKY THAN FROZEN ALIVE! BUT STILL PRETTY DAMN GOOD.

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By Little G Weevil

LittleGWeevil

This high energy album is definitely a 5star live cut. Everytime i put it on it makes me smile. The japanese crowd`s reaction is also amazing. Collins and his groovy band at their best. Not to miss.

eMusic Features

0

Houston Blues Guitars

By John Morthland, Contributor

They grew up together in Houston's rough-and-tumble Third Ward, played in bands together as teenagers. Albert Collins, Johnny Copeland and Joe Hughes were all devotees of the classic Texas electric guitar sound of T-Bone Walker and Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown. But all three absorbed their primary influences early on, and took the sound to three strikingly different places. Collins was the first to emerge nationally. In the late '50s and early '60s, he cut a string of… more »

1

Where Did the Blues Begin?

By John Morthland, Contributor

The biggest debate in blues circles these days is, "where did the blues begin?" Ever since the blues revival of the 50s and 60s, the answer has been "the Mississippi Delta." But in recent years, more than a few blues buffs have argued, that while the Delta is where the harshest form of blues indeed gelled, there is very little evidence to suggest that blues started there. Further, Delta blues in its heyday was almost… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Compared to Frozen Alive!, Live in Japan is a little more drawn-out and funky, featuring extended jamming on several songs. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing — Collins and his bandmates can work a groove pretty damn well. Of course, the main reason to listen to an Albert Collins album is to hear the man play. And play he does throughout Live in Japan, spitting out piercing leads with glee. On the whole, it’s not quite as consistent as Frozen Alive!, but that’s only by a slight margin. – Thom Owens