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Home Acres

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (51 ratings)
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Home Acres album cover
01
Building a Fire
2:11
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02
Moonless March
4:34
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03
Microviolence
4:24
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04
Searchlight
2:50
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05
Everything Goes My Way
4:38
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06
White Wind
4:35
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07
Cold Storage
3:37
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08
Blackout
4:08
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09
Waterwheel
3:18
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10
I'm in Trouble
3:09
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11
Ruins
5:01
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 42:25

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abstractglee

My children's 2nd-favorite band make their most versatile album yet, centered on percussive, piano-led pop songs with plenty of jazz chordings. Rhythmically propulsive, yet dreamy and sometimes gorgeous. The lyrics are best read (the singer's voice is usually mixed low for texture): they're like scenes from short stories, mixing precise details with in-character, often-interesting philosophical claims.

They Say All Music Guide

Thirteen years and going strong, Aloha deliver another atmospheric, percussive, post-rock record in the vein of classic Thrill Jockey artists (particularly Sea and Cake) that balances mathematical playing and subdued, dreamy soundscapes. Operating from four separate area codes (Washington DC, Brooklyn, Boston, and Cleveland), the four members wrote Home Acres by using a private-band blog over the course of three years before reuniting to record the album. Surviving distance and some roster shifts, the group still sounds like a tight-knit unit. The vibraphones have been toned back, and the songs are along the lines of their last outing, Light Works, in a toned-back indie pop style that sounds a little like latter-day Death Cab for Cutie or Built to Spill. “Searchlight” screams mainstream, with a big, sweetly exhaled chorus about craving good days and sunshine, but most of the other songs aren’t as overtly hooky, and focus more closely on the art of syncopation without being showy. Multi-instrumentalist T.J. Lipple does a nice job filling the gaps without overwhelming the mix, while the rhythm section zig-zags smoothly behind Tony Cavallario’s crystalline vocals. Home Acres never breaks any new barriers and it’s less cerebral than earlier outings, but it’s a good, consistent listen that showcases the band in their comfort zone. – Jason Lymangrover

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