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Anchors and Anvils

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (49 ratings)
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Anchors and Anvils album cover
01
Killing Him
3:04
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02
Tennessee Valentine
3:13
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03
That Beat
4:08
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04
Pointless Drinking
3:45
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05
Washing Machine
2:56
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06
Overcome
3:36
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07
People Get Mad
3:56
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08
Cupid's Arrow
3:16
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09
Time Is a Train
2:49
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10
I'll Remember You
3:52
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 34:35

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Country tinged blues with a twist

Royzee

An insidious effect this album will have on you. Almost too cute vocals but with an embittered edge that charms and yet troubles. A standout track is 'Pointless Drinking' which reminds me of KD Lang at her most sanguine. An excellent album from an artist new to me but I like her so much I downloaded two of her CDs.

They Say All Music Guide

There’s an offbeat, off-the-cuff quality that makes Amy LaVere’s Anchors & Anvils easy to like. First, there’s the choice of songs, like the opener, “Killing Him,” with LaVere sweetly singing that killing a love interest isn’t enough to make the love go away. This, of course, wouldn’t be very funny if a man sang it, but LaVere’s straight reading and the melancholy fiddle accompaniment find the right balance. Paul Taylor’s “Pointless Drinking” falls into a similar groove, a funny-sad song married to a ’50s-style melody. The simple arrangements add to the album’s left-of-center appeal, with steel guitars, fiddles, and guitars whipping up a lazy mixture that falls somewhere between old rock and country with perhaps a touch of jazz thrown in. At one moment, LaVere and company cover Tex-Mex (“Overcome”), the next, funky rock (“People Get Mad”). Even on a fairly straightforward song like “That Beat,” the band brings a carefree joy that commingles well with LaVere’s torch singer vocal. Unlike many singer/songwriters, LaVere has pulled good songs from a variety of sources, and even when she borrows a song from a familiar figure like Bob Dylan, she borrows one of his lesser-known songs (“I’ll Remember You”). Anchors & Anvils’ off-the-cuff qualities help separate the album from run-of-the-mill singer/songwriter product, and because of this, make LaVere more appealing than the average singer/songwriter. – Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr.

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