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Noble Beast

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (2250 ratings)
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Noble Beast album cover
01
Oh No
4:20
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02
Masterswarm
6:35
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03
Fitz and the Dizzyspells
3:36
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04
Effigy
5:06
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05
Tenuousness
3:51
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06
Nomenclature
2:54
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07
ouo
0:20
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08
Not a Robot, But a Ghost
5:37
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09
Unfolding Fans
0:57
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10
Anonanimal
4:47
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11
Natural Disaster
4:18
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12
The Privateers
3:24
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13
Souverian
7:18
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14
On Ho
1:08
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15
Take Courage (Bonus)
6:51
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Album Information
EXCLUSIVE // EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 61:02

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all of it

Elena_G

Where is this man's MacArthur Genuis grant?

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Better & better

flyertravler

This album keeps growing on me as time goes on. Great vocals. Love it.

user avatar

Love the Videos

kunzheinz57

Now I'm watching the videos Great job Emusic!!

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My new favorite

millionmaker1

This album is one that I listen to daily...and I've had it for over a month. LOVE it.

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One of my favs of 2009.

dcwizard

A solid consistent beautiful work.

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delicate, heavy

Symphonic

I have a hard time with this; the music is of tremendous quality, and I commend Mr. Bird for his courage in exploring what feels like a difficult emotional space, but that is itself the issue, the album as a whole has a thin gamut, a thorough exploration of a melancholy/searching/reclusive feeling, it can be too much to listen to in one sitting.

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Layered for your pleasure

EMUSIC-00221F50

The music whistles through the clutter of music today, it has a place among those that move to the Talking heads vibe...

user avatar

Thank you for originality.

justincarlson11

This, along with his previous work, is worth the time. Andrew Bird presents an original take on songcraft, rewarding the listener with careful and quirky arrangements of reckless beauty. This guy is the real deal. And catch a live show if you get the chance.

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Can't Stay for Long

tide.is.level

The musical prowess of this guy cannot be denied; his compositions are bordered, controlled and deliberate. This album is beautiful. These songs are like different rooms in an opulently decorated castle. But with ornamentation comes some clutter. One could find themselves tripping over the stuff he leaves lying about (deliberately).

user avatar

Kind

charlie4feet

of like this. But it's the kind of thing where if you saw this guy out, you might want to punch him. I can listen to it, but I don't know if I could be civil to its creator. And I would want to be nice to him, just like I want to really like this album because so much of it is catchy, but alas....I might still have to punch him

eMusic Features

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Interview: Andrew Bird

By Rachael Maddux, Contributor

Six albums into his career, Andrew Bird has established himself as a man of certain habits - the whistling, the violin, the sock-footed live shows - stuff that'd seem like a heap of geeky gimmicks if they weren't executed so well. Classically trained from an early age, he seems nothing if not a lover of routine and control; even when he's warbling about the end of the world, it's with poise, grace and intelligence. But when… more »

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Interview: Andrew Bird

By Amanda Petrusich, Contributor

Multi-instrumentalist Andrew Bird works in layers, stacking sounds and rhythms, building lush, heavily-orchestrated pop songs. On Bird's fourth full-length release, Armchair Apocrypha, his classical background (Bird was trained as a violinist) matches wits with his curious eye, and the resulting tracks are rich and delightful, as concerned with melody as they are with mitosis. eMusic: Your tour went green. Can you talk a little bit about your decision to use biodiesel, eat organic food, and recycle? Andrew… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Released in 2007, Armchair Apocrypha proved that hyper-literate singer/songwriter, genre-bending violin player, and peerless whistler Andrew Bird had found the perfect middle ground between his increasingly austere solo sets and the full-band grandeur of his days with the Bowl of Fire, a strategy he repeats with similar results on Noble Beast, his fifth full-length solo offering and second collection for the Mississippi-based Fat Possum label. Bird, a classically trained violinist since the age of four, has skillfully integrated nearly everything with strings on it into his repertoire since his conversion from the Weill and Brecht-heavy days of Music of Hair, Thrills, and Oh! The Grandeur to the semi-mainstream indie pop of The Swimming Hour, but it’s his seemingly limitless capacity for manipulation of the violin that dominates Noble Beast. Opening cut “Oh No,” a track that Bird began releasing sketches of months before the album’s street date, may be his most successful foray into the murky world of the potentially commercial pop song yet, boasting a chorus that points directly at the Shins while maintaining the artistic integrity of the loop-happy, meticulous craftsman who fans have been watching evolve since 2003′s Weather Systems. What follows is a typically eclectic batch of material that reflect Bird’s own musical time line. Tracks like “Masterswarm” and “Not a Robot, But a Ghost” are proof positive that he hasn’t completely abandoned his swing jazz roots, “Fitz and the Dizzyspells” could very well provide audiences with their first opportunity to “bust a move” at a show, while “Nomenclature”‘s easy country-folk front half dissolves into a rear end that wouldn’t seem out of place on a late-’90s Radiohead album. Throughout it all Bird rhymes — sometimes to a fault — like a history or biology professor (“From proto-Sanskrit Minoans to porto-centric Lisboans”), rendering many of the songs clever as opposed to emotionally resonant, but whatever romance he lacks in the textual medium he more than makes up for in melody. [The deluxe version of the album includes an impressive bonus disc of instrumental works, cleverly titled Useless Creatures, which features collaborations with Wilco drummer Glenn Kotche and jazz bassist Todd Sickafoose.] – James Christopher Monger

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