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East Flatbush Blues

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East Flatbush Blues album cover
01
Rawhide!
4:07
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02
Blue Grass Stomp
5:16
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03
Arkansas Traveler
1:38
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04
Golden Slippers
5:27
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05
Roots Waltz
5:46
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06
17
3:15
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07
East Flatbush Blues
3:28
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08
Sweet Patato
2:20
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09
Uman
6:26
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10
The Memphis Jacques
3:26
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11
Old Joe Clark?
10:05  
12
The 'Sensitive' Waltz
4:32
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 55:46

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They Say All Music Guide

Andy Statman is known both for his clarinet and mandolin playing, and he is equally adept at both. Sometimes his two worlds collide, but East Flatbush Blues finds him sticking to his strings, while the simultaneously recorded Awakening from Above is meant to showcase Statman’s clarinet work. He’s a restless performer with deep roots in Americana as well as various strains of world music (particularly klezmer), but this one’s all about the former, skipping from bluegrass to blues to traditional mountain music (with more than a bit of a New York touch, hence the title, which reflects on Statman’s 1979 Flatbush Waltz) with ease. Statman works here with bassist Jim Whitney and drummer Larry Eagle, and there is plenty of room for them to improvise — Whitney, in particular, sets off on a number of well thought-out solos. But mainly it’s about Statman’s virtuosity — from the first bars of the opening cover of Bill Monroe’s “Rawhide,” in which Statman reels off lightning licks on his axe, the focus is primarily on his fingers. Statman offers his takes on such standards as “Golden Slippers” and “Arkansas Traveler,” but it’s his original compositions, among them the earthy title track and the spare “Roots Waltz,” that prove the most impressive on the disc. Statman does break out the clarinet for a ten-minute tour de force reconfiguration of the trad “Old Joe Clark” that heads into some fairly psychedelic avant-garde territory, but the track seems out of place on this otherwise unadorned recording. – Jeff Tamarkin

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