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Green Chimneys: The Music of Thelonious Monk

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Green Chimneys: The Music of Thelonious Monk album cover
01
Green Chimneys
5:58
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Hackensack
4:38
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Brilliant Corners
3:31
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Monk's Dream
3:56
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'Round Midnight
5:42
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Bemsha Swing
4:58
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Shuffle Boil
5:33
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Boo Boo's Birthday
3:18
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Evidence
4:15
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Ugly Beauty
5:17
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Think Of One
4:10
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Light Blue/Rhythm-a-ning
3:20
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Ruby My Dear
2:51
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 57:27

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a comment on freeimprov's review

HSWT

I think you're missing the point. One of the beauties of Jazz, and I'm sure Monk would have agreed, is that there is no one right or wrong way to interpret a composition. Jazz is all about the freedom to twist and bend the written notes to be what you want them to be. As you say in your review this is Andy Summer's interpretation of Monk's compositions. It's not Andy Summers doing an imitation of Monk. If Summer's interpretation doesn't include what you call "equal parts insanity and devil may care" that's his choice. You are free to like or dislike it but I think you do a real disservice to the music be dismissing it as not valid on it's own.

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a half step removed

freeimprov

The nicest thing I can say about this album is that it's very well-produced. That's kind of sad, but it really is a good album. The worst part of it is the glossy production sheen that worked so well for the Police. But what's this about? MONK! Andy Summers is here to share his interpretation (and maybe introduce you to) one of the greatest jazz composers of all time, Thelonious Monk. But Summers' interpretations are a bit, well, too tasteful for my taste. Monk's music is equal parts insanity and devil may care, and that just doesn't quite come out here. Still, it sounds nice, and it's a good introduction if the rigors of straight jazz frighten you. So all that being said, I'd STRONGLY encourage you to pick this up only after dosing yourself with some REAL Monk! EMusic has real Monk masterpieces like Brilliant Corners and Mysterioso, albums full of the melodies and angular playing that impressed a famous master like Andy Summers enough to devote a whole album to his music.

eMusic Features

1

Icon: Sting & the Police

By Wayne Robins, Contributor

It was early 1979. The Police's debut album, Outlandos d'Amour had just been released. The band was on their round of debut performances in the United States, playing such showcase clubs as the Bottom Line in Manhattan and My Father's Place in Roslyn, Long Island. Most everyone in those 300-500 seaters who saw the Anglo-American trio of Stewart Copeland on drums, Andy Summers on guitar and Gordon "Sting" Sumner on bass and lead vocals -… more »

1

Icon: Sting & the Police

By Wayne Robins, Contributor

It was early 1979. The Police's debut album, Outlandos d'Amour had just been released. The band was on their round of debut performances in the United States, playing such showcase clubs as the Bottom Line in Manhattan and My Father's Place in Roslyn, Long Island. Most everyone in those 300-500 seaters who saw the Anglo-American trio of Stewart Copeland on drums, Andy Summers on guitar and Gordon "Sting" Sumner on bass and lead vocals -… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Guitarist Andy Summers long ago shed his Police-man’s uniform to take a stab at being a jazz fusion guitarist, and this is his toughest test, tackling 13 of Thelonious Monk’s most well known pieces. His backing band has some considerable talent; drummer Peter Erskine, organist Joey DeFrancesco, trumpeter Walt Fowler and cellist Hank Roberts are outstanding jazz musicians, and prove their mettle throughout. The CD overall is inconsistent, starting with an out-of-tune bass and an inaccurate reading of the title track. But it gets much better with horn charts, the precise Erskine and searing DeFrancesco saving grace on “Hackensack.” Then they really get down with Monk’s stealth Misterioso feel on “Brilliant Corners,” and an economical Summers works effectively on “Monk’s Dream.” Sting sings “‘Round Midnight” and botches the lyrics, but they come back strong for most of the remainder of the disc, especially with a pristine take on “Ugly Beauty,” a moderately raucous “Think of One,” a free-for-all “Light Blue/Rhythm-A-Ning,” with Erskine cutting loose, and Summers’ courteous solo acoustic finale on “Ruby My Dear.” Summers is rather noodle prone, though a sharp-edged John Abercrombie-type tone creeps in occasionally. You do hear considerable riffing, and less improvisation, so if you’re more into Jeff Beck than, say, Larry Coryell, bon appétit. There’s a fluid ease in Summers’ playing that suggests a real comfort zone and genuine love for this music. Sometimes that can go a long way, but still, this is for special tastes outside mainstream jazz. – Michael G. Nastos

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