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Fluorescent Black

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Fluorescent Black album cover
01
Lay Me Down
3:53
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02
New Jack Exterminator
4:23
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03
Reflections
3:28
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04
SHINE
2:27
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05
C Thru U
2:11
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06
Volcano
3:07
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07
Timpani
4:09
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08
Polar Bear Digital
3:10
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09
The Solution
3:21
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10
Get Lite
3:28
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11
NY To Tokyo
3:26
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12
New Frontier
3:16
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13
SuperUnfrontable
4:02
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14
Born Electric
3:01
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15
Apparently
2:28
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16
End Game
2:18
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17
Capricorn One
3:11
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18
Dragunov
1:29
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19
Fluorescent Black
4:57
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 19   Total Length: 61:45

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

Matthew Fritch

Contributor

Matthew Fritch spent more than a decade as senior editor of the Philadelphia-based magazine MAGNET, where he wrote about wildly unpopular indie rock bands and r...more »

12.14.10
Anti-Pop Consortium, Fluorescent Black
2009 | Label: Big Dada

When we last heard from Antipop Consortium, the trio of Brooklyn-based MCs were lock-stepping into the sunset amid the krautrock-laced rhythms of "Human Shield," the finale of 2002's Arrhythmia and perhaps the group's most accomplished track. The three vocalists — M. Sayyid, High Priest and Beans — were in perfect balance, with each member's distinctive delivery ratcheting up the intensity as producer Earl Blaize's minimal beats grew more insistent and powerful. Given the track's theme… read more »

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eMusic Features

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The Outer Limits: Kool Keith and the Ultramagnetic MCs

By Hua Hsu, Contributor

It was 1988 and space was, indeed, the final frontier. A brief history of rap until that moment might have read like this: first they toasted, then they shouted. Next came the couplets and syllables, uttered coolly, so as not to break a sweat. And then crash-landed the Ultramagnetic MCs - a band of brothers from another planet who came to reset the system. Why rhyme when you could fly in style? High school friends Kool… more »

They Say All Music Guide

During their few years together in the late ’90s and early 2000s, Antipop Consortium blazed a trail for forward-thinking rap. The trio of Beans, High Priest, and M. Sayyid (plus the critical help of longtime engineer Earl Blaize) rapped plenty of abstract scientifical madness, but they also had intelligence and hardcore flow to spare (think A Tribe Called Quest plus Marvel Comics). Musically, they were influenced by electronica but they also had the hard-hitting beats necessary for survival in a heavily competitive rap world. (Not for nothing were they on Warp, one of the best places to find experimental hip-hop in the early 2000s.) Of course, it’s always a grand proposition when standard-bearers return after a long absence, but no one in rap or experimental techno could have been fully prepared for Fluorescent Black, easily their best record — packed with more highlights than anything they’d released before, but also more cohesive than they’d ever been. With heavy claps on the beat but experimental effects shooting all over the mix, it’s just as innovative as fans would expect. And the rapping sounds rejuvenated, with Beans particularly, as Antipop Consortium rap over the best beats they’ve heard in years (despite a healthy number of projects during the interim). None of this is going to sell enough records to bother Jay-Z, and a track or two veer too close to MF Doom for comfort, but Fluorescent Black is easily one of the best rap records of the year. – John Bush

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