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Folkloric Feel

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (94 ratings)
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Folkloric Feel album cover
01
Folkloric Feel
7:49
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02
Sleepwalking Ballad
5:21
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03
Baby, You're in Luck
2:21
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04
Energy of Death
3:34
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05
Kings & Queens
5:07
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06
Song for Lorca
3:54
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Animal Fat
4:43
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08
Dark is What I Want / Strutters Ball
4:05
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09
Gleaning
4:30
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10
They Shoot Horses, Don't They
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11
(Untitled)
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 47:54

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Write a Review 6 Member Reviews

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Warm

ntnsvnty

This one got me through some cold dark winter mornings in Colorado.

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Nice Surprise

niktu

If you're into BSS then you'll probably dig this album. Not sure what criteria the person below used for determining that this is "just not good", but I was pleasantly surprised. Check it out!

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The best album of 2004!

LennonMcCartneyHarrisonStarr

A.W is touching sounds that nobody has ever touched like he has and made them his own art ;) Incorporating instruments such as el tres so beatuifuly accompanied by some of the most unique drum patterns I have heard since The Beatles (yet nothing at all close to the beatles sound). But very similar in the the fact that he paints amazing pictures with the music. On a production side I believe it to be one of the best recorded albums since Sgt. Peppers. Pasted together very well. If you have not bought yet do so. But listen to it don't just hear it.

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Just not good

blakey23

Skip this and download National Anthem of Nowhere immediately.

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Don't Be Scurred

TheGuy

I know...you're just sitting here...wondering about this album. The review sounded intriguing enough, and you know just enough about Broken Social Scene to keep you here--thinking. Take it from someone who took a chance: It's worth it. I promise.

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great bss offshoot

Idleness

or is that the other way around? Regardless, Andrew Whiteman has created a great folk/rock album that is even gf-who-hates-BSS-approved.

Recommended Albums

They Say All Music Guide

Had Andrew Whiteman never attempted to play the Cuban guitar, let alone stay eight weeks on an island in the Caribbean Sea, Apostle of Hustle might not have come to be. Apostle of Hustle allowed him to expand his indie rock palate into a nocturnal sphere of Latin music and post rock/experimental threads for what is the mind-bending soundscape of Folkloric Feel. It’s complimentary to the various Broken Social Scene offshoots — Valley of the Giants and Stars — but also a connection of sorts to Whiteman’s personal background and interests. The album’s title track highlights the overall cinematic backdrop from the start; sweeping percussion arrangements from Dean Stone and Julian Brown’s treading upright bass delivery carries Whiteman’s achingly beautiful sentiments of love, truth, and wonder. Select members from the Arts & Crafts recording family — Brendan Canning, Evan Cranley, Feist, Kevin Drew, Amy Milan, Dave Newfeld, and Lucy Bain — add to the mesmerizing dynamic of Folkloric Feel. From Newfeld’s streamlined production to Drew’s chilled piano sounds to Feist’s charming harmonies on “King & Queens” and “Animal Fat,” Folkloric Feel is a love fantasy. Hushing acoustic guitars creep along to the electric riffs of “Sleepwalking Ballad” for an eerie, yet radiant Jeff Buckley-like moment. “Baby, You’re in Luck,” which borrows from Toronto singer/songwriter Alex Lukashevsky’s “Tammy Twococks,” frolics with sparse Latin shades and Milan’s icy vocals for the album’s darkest, heartbreaking narrative. Apostle of Hustle offers an abstract, poetic design and fluid emotional illustrations a plenty on this album. Whiteman’s personal honesty and seriousness for fleshing out what’s in his head (and his heart) is what makes Folkloric Feel a stunning 2004 release. Apostle of Hustle is Whiteman’s chance to be a storyteller and Folkloric Feel is his fairy tale. – MacKenzie Wilson

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