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The Suburbs

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (125 ratings)

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The Suburbs album cover
01
The Suburbs
5:17  
02
Ready To Start
4:18  
03
Modern Man
4:42  
04
Rococo
3:59  
05
Empty Room
2:54  
06
City With No Children
3:14  
07
Half Light I
4:16  
08
Half Light II (No Celebration)
4:29  
09
Suburban War
4:47  
10
Month of May
3:53  
11
Wasted Hours
3:23  
12
Deep Blue
4:30  
13
We Used To Wait
5:03  
14
Sprawl (Flatland)
2:56  
15
Sprawl II (Mountains Beyond Mountains)
5:28  
16
The Suburbs (Continued)
1:28  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 16   Total Length: 64:37

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

J. Edward Keyes

Editor-in-Chief

Joe Keyes writes about music.

09.14.10
Arcade Fire, The Suburbs
Label: Sonovox / Arcade Fire Music

Let's briefly extend the benefit of the doubt and assume that, when Arcade Fire decided to name their third record The Suburbs, they were in on the joke. For decades, the suburbs have been synonymous with refuge: a lack of danger, the reassurance of repetition, and a consistent kowtowing to the relentless homogeneity of the middle. They are where you go for the comfort of the familiar, and where the rewards are satisfying because they… read more »

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user avatar

Great !!!

amosandy33

I love this album. This is their best one in my opinion.

user avatar

je me souviens

permafrost154

Remember the initial drooling over Neon Bible? Hindsight reveals it to be weak at best. Studio-tweaked vocals notwithstanding, this new puppy is headed for the same lowly dog pound. As a 3rd release, The Suburbs ain't no Born To Run, that's for sure, eh?

user avatar

Best. Album. Ever.

Silverado1953

I've played this once or twice a day every day since its release and I am still not remotely tired of it.

eMusic Features

0

Who Is…Little Scream

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Laurel Sprengelmeyer, who makes music as Little Scream, named her debut album The Golden Record — which might seem like an act of hubris if you think she means the kind that get framed and hung behind the desks of smug label executives. Fortunately, Sprengelmeyer was thinking more along the lines of the gold phonograph record that was bundled into the Voyager spacecraft in 1977, which bore in its grooves a Carl Sagan-approved playlist of… more »

0

Arcade Fire’s High Dive into the Big Empty

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

[album-card class="right" name="The Suburbs" artist="Arcade Fire" released="2010" label="Merge" link="http://www.arcadefire.com" image="http://wp-images.emusic.com/assets/2011/04/arcade-fire-the-suburbs.jpg"] Let's briefly extend the benefit of the doubt and assume that, when Arcade Fire decided to name their third record The Suburbs, they were in on the joke. For decades, the suburbs have been synonymous with refuge: a lack of danger, the reassurance of repetition, and a consistent kowtowing to the relentless homogeneity of the middle. They are where you go for the comfort of the… more »

2

The Politic Melodic: A Campaign Song History

By Yancey Strickler, Contributor

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They Say All Music Guide

Montreal’s Arcade Fire successfully avoided the sophomore slump with 2007’s apocalyptic Neon Bible. Heavier and more uncertain than their near perfect, darkly optimistic 2004 debut, the album aimed for the nosebleed section and left a red mess. Having already fled the cold comforts of suburbia on Funeral and suffered beneath the weight of the world on Neon Bible, it seems fitting that a band once so consumed with spiritual and social middle-class fury, should find peace “under the overpass in the parking lot.” If nostalgia is just pain recalled, repaired, and resold, then The Suburbs is its sales manual. Inspired by brothers Win and William Butler’s suburban Houston, TX upbringing, the 16-track record plays out like a long lost summer weekend, with the jaunty but melancholy Kinks/Bowie-esque title cut serving as its bookends. Meticulously paced and conservatively grand, fans looking for the instant gratification of past anthems like “Wake Up” or “Intervention” will find themselves reluctantly defending The Suburbs upon first listen, but anyone who remembers excitedly jumping into a friend’s car on a sleepy Friday night armed with heartache, hope, and no agenda knows that patience is key. Multiple spins reveal a work that’s as triumphant and soul-slamming as it is sentimental and mature. At its most spirited, like on “Empty Room,” “Rococo,” “City with No Children,” “Half Light II (No Celebration),” “We Used to Wait,” and the glorious Régine Chassagne-led “Sprawl II (Mountains Beyond Mountains),” the latter of which threatens to break into Blondie’s “Heart of Glass” at any moment, Arcade Fire makes the suburbs feel positively electric. Quieter moments reveal a changing of the guard, as Win trades in the Springsteen-isms of Neon Bible for Neil Young on “Wasted Hours,” and the ornate rage of Funeral for the simplicity of a line like “Let’s go for a drive and see the town tonight/There’s nothing do, but I don’t mind when I’m with you,” from album highlight “Suburban War.” The Suburbs feels like Richard Linklater’s Dazed & Confused for the Y generation. It’s serious without being preachy, cynical without dissolving into apathy, and whimsical enough to keep both sentiments in line, and of all of their records, it may be the one that ages so well. – James Christopher Monger

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