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Hopes And Fears

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (58 ratings)
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Hopes And Fears album cover
01
On Suicide
1:28
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02
The Dividing Line
4:11
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03
Joan
3:06
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04
Maze
5:06
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05
In Two Minds
8:58
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06
Terrain
3:49
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07
The Tube
3:05
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08
The Dance
5:09
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09
The Pirate Song
1:28
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10
Labyrinth
2:15
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11
Riddle
2:49
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12
Moeris Dancing
5:15
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13
Piers
2:12
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 48:51

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Post-Henry Cow

In_Praise_of_Folly

First off, it deserves saying that Chris Cutler is one of my drumming heroes. I was a bit disappointed with his performance here (not that it's bad), but Fred Frith and Dagmar Krause more than make up for it. Many of these songs were recorded at the same time as Henry Cow's Western Culture album, but were not deemed appropriate for that album. Thus was the first Art Bears album born. The lyrics are communist in nature, and the vocals are, well, strange. Dagmar Krause has a fascinating voice that is sure to turn off 90% of listeners, but for the other ten percent (such as myself), it makes her one of the greatest female singers ever. I wish emusic would add the other Art Bears albums, since I already own this one, but you can't have everything, can you? Recommended.

user avatar

brilliant

slinkp

Nothing quite like it. If you like inventive and idiosyncratic guitar and drum work, bizarre horn arrangements, mixtures of british folk music and modernist atonality, plus obnoxious lo-fi sounds ahead of their time, check this out. "Terrain" gives a good sense of the scope of the record. "The Pirate Song" sounds like something out of Brecht. There's even a not bad Who tribute in the middle of "In Two Minds". I'm praying that emusic adds their other two albums ("Winter Songs" and "The World as it Is Today"), I've been looking for those for ages.

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gotta tell you sam

Woopa

this in't really pop-rock as it's described, but if'n y'like residents, l'ange pete hammill, weird synth-prog music much less commercial then say, helium/m.timony (whom i giddy up good), and robert wyatt then this is an album for y'ears nah y'peers. playit sam. Drink..good, smoke..good,...friend... we weird, we here get used to it (or don't as you'll never hear this anywhere ever never agin..) . fwok!

They Say All Music Guide

The first album from Dagmar Krause, Chris Cutler, and Fred Frith’s post-Henry Cow project is one of the art rock masterpieces of the 1970s. It’s as politically potent as Henry Cow’s more strident work, but couched in more poetic and provocative terms. Opening with Bertolt Brecht’s “On Suicide,” with Krause declaiming the playwright’s bitter lyrics in her semi-operatic style to the wheezing accompaniment of Frith’s harmonium, the album continues in that uncompromising vein. Although most of the other members of Henry Cow guest, with reeds player Lindsay Cooper and keyboardist Tim Hodgkinson playing on a majority of the 13 songs, Hopes and Fears is considerably more focused and powerful than that group’s often scattershot albums. The songs are built on Cutler’s impressively varied drumming (often on electronically modified instruments), and the amazing variety of sounds Frith is able to coax out of a battery of electric and acoustic guitars, but there’s enough space in the music for Krause’s unique vocals to shine. Highlights include the epic, multi-part “In Two Minds,” parts of which are as close as the Art Bears ever come to conventional rock music (which is to say, not very close at all, but there’s an electric guitar solo), and the puckish instrumental, “Moeris Dancing.” – Stewart Mason

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