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A Little Busy

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01
A Little Busy
6:18
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02
Joelle
5:14
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03
The Witch Doctor
5:33
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04
Afrique
6:58
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05
Lost and Found
5:07
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06
Those Who Sit and Wait
5:54
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 6   Total Length: 35:04

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Originally titled The Witch Doctor on Blue Note.

midcoastmaine

Art Blakley - drums, Bobby Timmons - piano, Wayne Shorter - sax, Lee Morgan - trumbet, Jymie Merritt - bass. Recorded in 1961 but released in 1967, this was reported to be one of Blakely's favorite albuns

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