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The Land, the Bread, and the People

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (15 ratings)
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The Land, the Bread, and the People album cover
01
Tale Of The Ballydowse
4:08
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02
Sails
4:20
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03
Bud Morris
3:18
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04
Lucrece
5:51
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05
The Banshee Song
3:22
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06
Walkin' On
3:34
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07
Song For Elie
5:34
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08
Innocent Born
5:13
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09
Bleak
4:27
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10
The Didge Song
4:05
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11
Nothing
3:38
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12
The Land, The Bread, And The People
3:55
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13
Redhands
4:07
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 55:32

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unsurpressable energy!

gustapetes

good songs for the most part but the mix was (and is) terrible, but 7 years later its just to much nostalgia to talk in the present tense. the reviewer missed the street punk/oi! sound, a change from the hardcore of the dog. call me hardcore and you'll get an earful. thanks for excluding me robina & dk in the credits, btw. the sound of the bally's live was the greatest ever heard, i say, and we did our best with the knowledge we had to make peace and kick ass. better days ahead... nathan peters

They Say All Music Guide

Don’t believe it if you’re told that Ballydowse resembles the Pogues, Oysterband, and early Waterboys. Sure, they occasionally utilize mandolin, bodhran, fiddle, and pipes but their style is more closely associated with that of Crashdog, a previous incarnation of Ballydowse which included vocalist Andrew Mandell and bass player Brian Grover. It’s predominantly the punk vocals and crunch rhythm that dictates the course of these songs. Dave Baumgartner’s fiddle certainly adds seasoning — be it Celtic or Klezmer — and the presence of didjeridu may give the false impression that they’re influenced by Aboriginal music, but Ballydowse are essentially a punk-rock outfit who are willing to incorporate folksy accents into their music, thus separating themselves from the other groups who can’t figure out how to make punk music interesting. – Dave Sleger

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