|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Ya No Hace Falta

Rate It! Avg: 3.5 (3 ratings)
Retail
Member
Ya No Hace Falta album cover
01
Opening
2:52
$0.49
$0.99
02
Ya No Hace Falta
6:30
$0.49
$0.99
03
Se Le Fue la Mano
6:32
$0.49
$0.99
04
El Protagonista
6:08
$0.49
$0.99
05
Recapacita
4:20
$0.49
$0.99
06
La Tremenda
5:25
$0.49
$0.99
07
El Manisero
5:21
$0.49
$0.99
08
Candil de Nieve
5:32
$0.49
$0.99
09
El Pillo
7:06
$0.49
$0.99
10
Lo Mio
4:47
$0.49
$0.99
11
Lo Que Quiero Es Bamboleo
4:51
$0.49
$0.99
12
Ya No Hace Falta (2)
4:30
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 63:54

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 0 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

They Say All Music Guide

One of the best-known groups on the crest of the timba wave, a new style mixing salsa with funk and jazz elements emanating from Cuba’s streets, Bamboleo stays on the cutting edge with 1999′s Ya No Hace Falta. Having stepped into international notoriety with Yo No Me Parezco a Nadie in 1997, the pressure was on to deliver to their newly won fan base. With smooth arrangements and a drum-tight band, Bamboleo had no trouble making good on their reputation, and if anything, they raised the bar for the entire genre. Both the horn section and vocalists have a cool, suave approach that contrasts the lightning-rod-hot sound of similar groups like Charanga Habanera or NG la Banda. This smoky, jazzy sensibility juxtaposed against the sharp corners of the super-funky rhythm section makes for an easy, pleasurable listen. The group certainly does not want for heat, with salty montunos from pianist/arranger Lazaro Valdes and plenty of time-shifting breaks from a percussion section as good as any operating today. Sonically speaking, the ears rejoice to hear a timba record that doesn’t want for fidelity or modern production sensibilities. Thanks to their well-balanced overall sound, unique approach, and expert musicianship, Bamboleo is sure to be setting trends and erasing boundaries for decades to come. – Evan C. Gutierrez

more »