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One Foot In The Grave (Deluxe Reissue)

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One Foot In The Grave (Deluxe Reissue) album cover
01
He's A Mighty Good Leader
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Sleeping Bag
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I Get Lonesome
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Burnt Orange Peel
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Cyanide Breath Mint
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See Water
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Ziplock Bag
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Hollow Log
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Forcefield
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Fourteen Rivers Fourteen Floods
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Asshole
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I've Seen The Land Beyond
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Outcome
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Girl Dreams
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Painted Eyelids
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Atmospheric Conditions
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It's All In Your Mind
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Whiskey Can Can
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Mattress
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Woe On Me
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Teenage Wastebasket
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Your Love Is Weird
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Favorite Nerve
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Piss On The Door
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Close To God
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Sweet Satan
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Burning Boyfriend
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Black Lake Morning
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Feather In Your Cap
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One Foot In The Grave
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Teenage Wastebasket
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I Get Lonesome
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 32   Total Length: 72:43

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user avatar

Wally needs spelling lessons

fatanky

I mean hole album? harmoneus? hahaha

user avatar

The man needs to lay off the drugs.......

Wally_le_Grand

I will be courteous by not understanding how some can say that this is his best.Wow i think the hole album is a piece of crap.These one minute two minutes songs are cheap,words are not harmoneus with the song.I had a hard time listening to 20 seconds of each,let alone buiing the hole thing.If i had their talent i would give the consumer his money's worth

user avatar

Beck with 2/3 of Lync.

comma8

It needs to be noted that Beck is joined by Sam Jayne and James Bertram of Lync (at the time). Lync was Olympia's Van Halen, and released one of K Records finest releases of the decade. Betram went on to Red Stars Theory and 764-hero for a bit while Jayne went on to Love as Laughter - a lo-fi play around effort turned full band. If you look at the rest of the backing group, you'll see Beck joined by equally (if not more) talented peers who have records well worth seeking out.

user avatar

the man's got an amazing range.

LeftEar

A survey of Beck's work would give most music lovers whiplash. Not many of us love all of his work, at least not equally. But this album is one of his core works, even if overlooked.

user avatar

YES

bozogoot

I miss this from beck: his sense of humor and his ramshackle stylings. Yes, this is a very primitive record and sounds like it cost bout 500 bucks to make... but that is the beauty. There are some amazing songs like asshole, i get lonesome, and hollow log. teenage wastebasket is m new fav b side jam. If you are a true fan.... this is a must have.

user avatar

Best

ODBHB

I honestly believe this is Beck's best, at least the original release, i haven't listen to all the new stuff on the reissue yet. Check out 'Forcefield' if you are not sure...

user avatar

Underappreciated

SamwiseGanja

This album is actually great. I don't understand the disappointment by many of the reviewers. It has an old school blues feel, and it clearly is a genre he is passionate about. Plus he has guest spots from Calvin Johnson and Sam Jayne from Love as Laughter as well as others. Also, if you like Odelay, you can hear the guitar influence specifically in this album. Get it.

user avatar

In the beginning...

Oliveme

there was Beck. He had One Foot in the Grave and it was good. Years later, many hoits later, the reissue of this album provides a context for the music has made since then. The "Deluxe Reissue" has some nice whistles and bells, but nothing that is a must have. At the same time, I concur with the tag that labels this a deal.

user avatar

For the most devoted fans only

ColtraneWasGod

If you came to Beck from his major label work as I did, and find songs such as "Devil's Haircut,""Loser,""New Pollution," "Nobody's Fault," or "Where It's At" to be both catchy and subversive, you won't find much to like here. These are primitive, raw, unpolished efforts that won't draw you in with their authenticity so much as they will annoy you with their amateurism.

user avatar

Disappointing

kajman

Huge Beck fan. Really like some of his mellow stuff. But found very little rewarding here.

They Say All Music Guide

Recorded prior to Mellow Gold but released several months after that album turned Beck into an overnight sensation, One Foot in the Grave bolsters his neo-folkie credibility the way the nearly simultaneously released Stereopathetic Soul Manure accentuated his underground noise prankster credentials. One Foot is neatly perched between authentic folk-blues — it opens with “He’s a Mighty Good Leader,” a traditional number sometimes credited to Skip James, and he rewrites Rev. Gary Davis’ “You Gotta Move” as “Fourteen Rivers Fourteen Floods” — and the shambolic, indie anti-folk coming out of the Northwest in the early ’90s, a connection underscored by the record’s initial release on Calvin Johnson’s Olympia, WA-based K Records, and its production by Johnson, who also sings on a couple of cuts. Parts of One Foot in the Grave may be reminiscent of other K acts, particularly the ragged parts, but it’s also distinctively Beck in how it blurs lines between the past and present, the traditional and the modern, the sincere and the sarcastic. Certainly, of his three 1994 albums, One Foot errs in favor of the sincere, partially due to those folk-blues covers, but also in its overall hushed feel, its muted acoustic guitars and murmured vocals suggesting an intimacy that the words don’t always convey. Much of the album is about mood as much as song, a situation not uncommon to Beck, which is hardly a problem because the ramshackle sound is charming and the songwriting is often excellent, channeling Beck’s skewed sensibilities into a traditional setting, particularly on the excellent “Asshole,” which is hardly as smirking as its title. It’s that delicate, almost accidental, balance of exposed nerves and cutting with that sets One Foot in the Grave apart from Beck’s other albums; he’d revisit this sound and sensibility, but never again was he so beguilingly ragged. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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