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Into Somethin'

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (3 ratings)
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Into Somethin' album cover
01
In Walked Bud
4:43
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02
All In Love Is Fair
4:45
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03
Lovesick Blues (feat. Rod McGaha)
3:28
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04
Try Again (feat. Jeff Hall)
4:44
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05
I Can't Make You Love Me
4:11
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06
Along Came Betty
4:01
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07
Here's That Rainy Day (feat. Rod McGaha)
4:55
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08
No Way Out (feat. Roy Agee)
4:52
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09
Stablemates
5:08
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10
Miss Ferguson, I Presume (feat. Jim Ferguson)
4:08
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11
They Can't Take That Away From Me (feat. Roy Agee)
4:29
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 49:24

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Fresh perspective from this prolific pianist

gregorybyerline

Into Somethin' marks a departure from Beegie Adair's standard piano jazz trio outings to present a collection of solo and duo recordings of songs ranging from bepop to ballads to toe-tappers including instrumentals and a few vocals. Definitely different; definitely Beegie.

They Say All Music Guide

Unlike most of Beegie Adair’s albums, which serve as tributes to songwriters and performers and present her piano interpretations of their music, Into Somethin’ has no particular theme; rather, it serves as a showcase for Adair’s musical approach. Also, it eschews the piano trio format of many of her other discs, with her solo piano occupying the spotlight, except when she cedes it to a guest vocalist or horn player. That happens several times on the album, as singers Roy Agee, Jim Ferguson, and Jeff Hall take the lead on the Adair originals “Try Again” and “Miss Ferguson, I Presume,” as well as “No Way Out.” The last track also features Agee’s trombone, although his main instrumental showcase is on the Gershwins’ “They Can’t Take That Away from Me.” Trumpeter Rod McGaha, meanwhile, is heard on “Lovesick Blues” and “Here’s That Rainy Day.” Whether Adair is on her own or supporting one of her fellow performers, she takes her usual tack at the interpretations, preferring musical embellishment and style over improvisation. The melodies are never in danger of disappearing, even if Adair or one of the horn men add or subtract notes, or vary the time. She may be playing a pop standard or even a jazz favorite such as Thelonious Monk’s “In Walked Bud,” but she is not going to take too many liberties. As a result, her playing is always entertaining, if rarely challenging. – William Ruhlmann

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