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The Flying Club Cup

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (1582 ratings)
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The Flying Club Cup album cover
01
A Call To Arms
0:20
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02
Nantes
3:52
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03
A Sunday Smile
3:37
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04
Guyamas Sonora
3:33
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05
La Banlieue
1:59
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06
Cliquot
3:53
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07
The Penalty
2:24
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08
Forks and Knives (La Fête)
3:35
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09
In The Mausoleum
3:12
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10
Un Dernier Verre (Pour La Route)
2:53
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11
Cherbourg
3:35
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12
St. Apollonia
3:00
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13
The Flying Club Cup
3:05
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 38:58

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Write a Review 45 Member Reviews

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Lovely

indiesoc

If you love 3/4 time signatures (which I sure do), don't feel that all music needs to be "cranked up to 11," and don't have an insecurity complex that causes you to give one star reviews to anything that might be related to "hipster" culture . . . well, then you just might enjoy this album. "Nantes" is one of the most sadly beautiful songs of the '00s.

user avatar

stupid, shallow

chordophone

Another dumb record by the band that personifies everything that's wrong with 'indie' music. Shallow, pretentious, unremarkable. I think Beirut must have been created by a board of directors or some marketing firm.

user avatar

Not for me, but...

culturedump

This is the kind of album that appeals to a certain sort of poetic mope. Decent song writing, points for originality but nothing that make you say, "You have to hear this song. Crank it up."

user avatar

Download it. Now.

javachip

Absolutely amazing. I can't get enough of this album; it's Beirut's crowning glory. Every time I listen to it I feel like nothing is impossible and have a strange urge to travel the world. Quaintly inspiring.

user avatar

Unique

MileHighRob

and amazing. Get it and let it take you back to a place you know not.

user avatar

Um-Pa-Pa

Dueloverheadcam

I think they seriously overestimated the 'quirky, charming-ness' of the obnoxious 3/4 rhythm used in literally almost every song...very little variety here. I had to put this one down after a few listens.

user avatar

pure beauty

EMUSIC-019F3E9A

one of the best albums my ears have heard, and my heart has loved...

user avatar

More excellence

JazzAlbee

More goodness from Zach Condon. A francophile who does more tango and french influenced stuff on this album, more beautiful songs. Can't get enough.

user avatar

Really worth downloading

GLEN-BASS-PLAYER

Horns, eastern European feel, decent lyrics and the whitest sounding vocals in years. Any of Beiruit's albums are OK, but this is my fave.

user avatar

Just download it now

Dibs

This is a truly wonderful album, quirky, intelligent, and tuneful.

eMusic Features

0

Six Degrees of Beirut’s The Rip Tide

By Peter Margasak, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Beirut’s The Rip Tide

By Peter Margasak, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Balkan Bacchanal

By Richard Gehr, Contributor

One line of thirsty listeners made its way toward kegs of dark beer. Another longer line followed the contours of Upper Manhattan's Good Shepherd School gymnasium toward several tables bearing cheese, sausages, hummus, grape leaves and other meze snacks. And a third, even longer, line of folk dancers snaked through the crowded gym, stepping and kicking hand-in-hand to the fulsome sounds of the Zlatne Uste Balkan Brass Band, hosts of the 24th annual night-long Golden… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Credit Zach Condon for not acting his age. While many 21-year-olds are working on finishing up their undergraduate years, Condon is making albums. And not just any messily-recorded-in-the-garage (or GarageBand) albums, but fully developed and composed and realized albums. His first full-length, under the name Beirut, Gulag Orkestar, with its Eastern European-inspired horns and strings, a kind of Neutral Milk Hotel-meets-gypsy field recordings, was adored in the indie rock world, and its successor, The Flying Club Cup, is an even more mature accomplishment. Though not as immediately catchy as his debut, The Flying Club Cup contains a sense of intrigue that pulls the listener in beguilingly, twisting and swaying and marching its way through the romanticized ideas of the Balkan town, the rustic Southern French village, the small Italian trattoria. It’s elaborate New World indie pop that tries to touch the Old as best it can. Flügelhorns and accordions and mandolins line the 13 songs here like old bricks, Condon’s voice rising elegiacally over in layered swells, tired and wise, inspired by, but not limited to, the rich French musical past, from Tino Rossi to Jacques Brel. Because Beirut plays music that feels like it’s been reflected off a long and storied life, there’s the possibility for unearned pretension to appear, but there’s a real sincerity, and a sense of life, that finds its way into the songs here. Condon and his collaborators (which include Final Fantasy’s Owen Pallett, who even sings on the lovely “Cliquot”) have not forgotten the kind of jocularity and community inherent in the folk traditions they pull from, so even as violins, organs, and harpsichords play dramatic and acute melodies and the vocals ascend to a feverish intensity, that feeling of being in the back of some tavern, passing around dishes and glasses and singing aloud with your compatriots, is present, and keeps things grounded, more real. “In the Mausoleum” balances syncopated piano with minor melodies and an ominous upright bass, while both “Guyamas Sonora” and the title track use dramatic horns to convey a kind of triumph in the prosperity of the tradition. It’s thoughtful and fun and sophisticated, utterly alluring, another fantastic success by Zach Condon. – Marisa Brown

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