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Colors

Rate It! Avg: 5.0 (8 ratings)
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Colors album cover
01
Foam Born (A) the Backtrack
2:13
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02
(B) the Decade of Statues
5:20
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03
Informal Gluttony
6:47
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04
Sun of Nothing
10:58  
05
Ants of the Sky
13:10  
06
Prequel to the Sequel
8:36
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07
Viridian
2:51
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08
White Walls
14:13  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 8   Total Length: 64:08

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WHY CANT YOU DOWNLOAD THE FULL ALBUM???? WTF

RaggaPunxUnite

it's cool I didn't want 40 of the minutes of the album. how retarded

They Say All Music Guide

Somewhat of an anomaly on the otherwise more conservative, pop-punk and hardcore oriented Victory Records label, Between the Buried and Me play a progressive style of extreme metal that attempts to incorporate a wide range of styles and moods alongside its staple diet of death and power metal. To their credit, with Colors, they manage the transitions very well: frenetic, thrashy riffs are seamlessly traded for thumping metalcore breakdowns, while death grunts and growls sit well alongside soft melodic vocal lines and dense, Porcupine Tree-aping harmonies. Opener “Foam Born, Pt. A: The Backtrack” marries sappy ’70s rock piano schlock with furious tapped guitar textures, flowing seamlessly into the aggressive death metal riffing of “Foam Born, Pt. B: The Decade of Statues” and centerpiece “Informal Gluttony.” Each of the eight tracks is designed to flow into the next, creating the impression of a continuously evolving piece rather than a collection of tracks, but it’s a mixed bag musically. At times the creativity and emotional lure of the material is enchanting, but too often Between the Buried and Me force a constant stream of evolving riffs (it is primarily a guitarist’s album) instead of exploring the full depth of the original idea. The effect is less of continuous evolution, than a constant stream of promising and half-baked ideas, and in this instance the color of monotony is rarely too far away. – Dave Donnelly

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