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Big Bill Broonzy Vol. 1 1927 - 1932

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Big Bill Broonzy Vol. 1 1927 - 1932 album cover
01
House Rent Stomp
2:58
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02
Big Bill Blues (20373)
3:04
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03
Down In The Basement Blues
2:47
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04
Starvation Blues (20923)
2:58
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05
I Can't Be Satisfied (9599)
3:00
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06
Grandma's Farm
3:00
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07
Skoodle Do Do (9601)
3:01
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08
Tadpole Blues
2:49
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09
Skoodle Do Do (16573)
2:34
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10
Saturday Night Rub (9594)
2:56
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11
Pig Meat Strut (9587)
3:01
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12
Papa's Gettin' Hot
3:01
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13
Police Station Blues
2:51
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14
They Can't Do That
2:44
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15
State Street Woman
2:47
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16
Meanest Kind Of Blues
2:50
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17
I Got The Blues For My Baby
2:57
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18
The Banker's Blues
2:48
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19
How You Wan't Done? (17284)
2:32
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20
Too Too Train Blues (18383)
2:46
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21
Mistreatin' Mamma (18384)
2:26
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22
Big Bill Blues (18385)
2:48
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23
Brown Skin Shuffle
3:18
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24
Stove Pipe Stomp
3:30
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25
Beedle Um Bum
3:00
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26
Selling That Stuff Note
2:39
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 26   Total Length: 75:05

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Kickoff time

RevScreamin'BenJenkins

Broonzy's kickoff to a kickass career. Great buy for old school blues lovers. Also sample some of the older Broonzy albums. He was a great singer and could lay it down on guitar. The album where Big Bill does some folk tunes is another disc worth checking out.

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Be Careful!

pianorolf

music doesn't correspond to titles (e.g. behind #17 is "Saturday Night Rub")

eMusic Features

0

Big Bill Broonzy: The Blues Ambassador

By John Morthland, Contributor

Consider Big Bill Broonzy. Here's a guy who wrote such blues standards as "Key to the Highway." As a writer-producer-sessions player for '30s blues A&R man Lester Melrose, he shaped the sound of blues in Chicago before there was a recognized Chicago blues style. He was one of the first bluesmen to be taken in by – and to shape his music for – white audiences, and he opened up the European market for postwar… more »

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The Black Fiddler’s Unlikely Home in Blues

By John Morthland, Contributor

In the 19th century, the most popular instruments played by black musicians in America were the banjo and the fiddle, and black and white string bands had virtually indistinguishable sounds. By the early days of the recording industry, though, both were on the way out. Yet the fiddle in particular was still prevalent enough that a fair number of black players were recorded, particularly in blues and jazz, and that's a good thing. With its… more »

0

Outre Limits (And Then some)

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

The Concept Album, enshrined in such epic meisterworks as Tommy and The Wall, not to mention Styx's Kilroy Was Here, is often given short (about the only thing short about them) shrift in the instant d-load of a favored track. But ever since the invention of Long Playing discs allowed rock musicians the same four dimensions enjoyed by classical symphonists and operatic composers and jazz improvisers, there will be artists who think on a scale… more »

0

Early Electric Guitarist George Barnes Mixes It Up

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

So who was the first electric guitarist on a Bob Dylan single? Well, duh, you can read a headline — not Mike Bloomfield, not Robbie Robertson, but George Barnes, in 1962. The record was Mixed-Up Confusion, the band skiffling like Bill Black's combo behind Elvis. Producer John Hammond's idle comment about cutting the tune, that they even tried it with a Dixieland band, sent collectors scurrying for a lost take. But Hammond may have meant… more »

They Say All Music Guide

This is a particularly fascinating CD, for it has the first 26 selections ever recorded by Big Bill Broonzy as a leader. The beginning of Document’s complete reissuance of all of Broonzy’s early recordings, the set starts with four duet numbers that Broonzy cut during 1927-28 with fellow guitarist John Thomas. Although his style was already a bit recognizable, the young guitarist/vocalist really started coming into his own in 1930. There are 15 selections from that year included on this set, with Big Bill often using the pseudonyms of Sammy Sampson or Big Bill Johnson; in fact, even the final seven numbers (from 1932) had him billed as the latter. The CD finds Broonzy evolving from a country-blues musician who already had strong technique into a star of hokum records. Among the many highlights are “Big Bill Blues” (different versions in 1928 and 1932), “I Can’t Be Satisfied,” “Pig Meat Strut,” “Beedle Um Bum” and “Selling That Stuff.” Pianist Georgia Tom Dorsey helps out on three numbers. Big Bill Broonzy fans have a right to rejoice about the existence of this wonderful series. – Scott Yanow

more »