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Big Bill Broonzy Vol. 12 (1945-1947)

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Big Bill Broonzy Vol. 12 (1945-1947) album cover
01
Please Believe Me
2:44
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02
Why Did You Do That To Me
3:00
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03
You Got To Play your Hand
3:10
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04
Just A Dream
3:00
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05
Doing The Best I Can
2:51
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06
Partnership Woman
2:35
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07
Humble Blues
2:51
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08
Oh Baby
2:44
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09
Cell No. 13 Blues
2:51
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10
When I Get To Thinkin'
2:51
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11
Roll Them Bones
2:43
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12
You Got The Best Go
2:45
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13
I Can Fix It
2:54
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14
Old Man Blues
3:15
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15
I Can't Write
2:43
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16
What Can I Do
3:05
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17
San Antonio Blues
3:03
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18
Saturday Evening Blues
3:07
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19
Ng Bill's Boogie
3:05
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20
Just Rocking
2:39
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21
Shoo Blues
2:58
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22
Stop Lying Woman
2:46
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23
Rambling Bill
2:49
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24
Summer Time Blues
3:11
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25
Bad Luck Man
3:16
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 25   Total Length: 72:56

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eMusic Features

0

Big Bill Broonzy: The Blues Ambassador

By John Morthland, Contributor

Consider Big Bill Broonzy. Here's a guy who wrote such blues standards as "Key to the Highway." As a writer-producer-sessions player for '30s blues A&R man Lester Melrose, he shaped the sound of blues in Chicago before there was a recognized Chicago blues style. He was one of the first bluesmen to be taken in by – and to shape his music for – white audiences, and he opened up the European market for postwar… more »

0

The Black Fiddler’s Unlikely Home in Blues

By John Morthland, Contributor

In the 19th century, the most popular instruments played by black musicians in America were the banjo and the fiddle, and black and white string bands had virtually indistinguishable sounds. By the early days of the recording industry, though, both were on the way out. Yet the fiddle in particular was still prevalent enough that a fair number of black players were recorded, particularly in blues and jazz, and that's a good thing. With its… more »

0

Outre Limits (And Then some)

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

The Concept Album, enshrined in such epic meisterworks as Tommy and The Wall, not to mention Styx's Kilroy Was Here, is often given short (about the only thing short about them) shrift in the instant d-load of a favored track. But ever since the invention of Long Playing discs allowed rock musicians the same four dimensions enjoyed by classical symphonists and operatic composers and jazz improvisers, there will be artists who think on a scale… more »

0

Early Electric Guitarist George Barnes Mixes It Up

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

So who was the first electric guitarist on a Bob Dylan single? Well, duh, you can read a headline — not Mike Bloomfield, not Robbie Robertson, but George Barnes, in 1962. The record was Mixed-Up Confusion, the band skiffling like Bill Black's combo behind Elvis. Producer John Hammond's idle comment about cutting the tune, that they even tried it with a Dixieland band, sent collectors scurrying for a lost take. But Hammond may have meant… more »