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Big Bill Broonzy Vol. 2 1932 - 1934

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Big Bill Broonzy Vol. 2 1932 - 1934 album cover
01
You Do It (Steele Smith, Vcl)
2:59
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02
Mr. Conductor Man
3:25
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03
Too-Too Train Blues (11605)
2:48
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04
Worrying You Off My Mind - Part 1
3:00
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05
Worrying You Off My Mind - Part 2
2:43
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06
Shelby County Blues
3:26
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07
Mistreatin' Mamma Blues (11609)
3:27
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08
Bull Cow Blues
3:36
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09
How You Want It Done? (11611)
2:55
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10
Long Tall Mama
3:33
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11
M And O Blues
3:18
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12
Rukus Juice Blues
3:25
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13
Friendless Blues
3:07
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14
Milk Cow Blues
3:13
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15
Hungry Man Blues
2:49
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16
I'll Be Back Home Again
2:54
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17
Bull Cow Blues - Part 2
2:53
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18
Serve It To Me Right
3:04
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19
Starvation Blues (80394)
3:20
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20
Mississippi River Blues
3:09
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21
At The Break Of Day
3:07
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22
I Want To Go Home
2:53
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23
Hard Headed Woman
3:02
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24
Dying Day Blues
3:10
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 24   Total Length: 75:16

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eMusic Features

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Big Bill Broonzy: The Blues Ambassador

By John Morthland, Contributor

Consider Big Bill Broonzy. Here's a guy who wrote such blues standards as "Key to the Highway." As a writer-producer-sessions player for '30s blues A&R man Lester Melrose, he shaped the sound of blues in Chicago before there was a recognized Chicago blues style. He was one of the first bluesmen to be taken in by – and to shape his music for – white audiences, and he opened up the European market for postwar… more »

0

The Black Fiddler’s Unlikely Home in Blues

By John Morthland, Contributor

In the 19th century, the most popular instruments played by black musicians in America were the banjo and the fiddle, and black and white string bands had virtually indistinguishable sounds. By the early days of the recording industry, though, both were on the way out. Yet the fiddle in particular was still prevalent enough that a fair number of black players were recorded, particularly in blues and jazz, and that's a good thing. With its… more »

0

Outre Limits (And Then some)

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

The Concept Album, enshrined in such epic meisterworks as Tommy and The Wall, not to mention Styx's Kilroy Was Here, is often given short (about the only thing short about them) shrift in the instant d-load of a favored track. But ever since the invention of Long Playing discs allowed rock musicians the same four dimensions enjoyed by classical symphonists and operatic composers and jazz improvisers, there will be artists who think on a scale… more »

0

Early Electric Guitarist George Barnes Mixes It Up

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

So who was the first electric guitarist on a Bob Dylan single? Well, duh, you can read a headline — not Mike Bloomfield, not Robbie Robertson, but George Barnes, in 1962. The record was Mixed-Up Confusion, the band skiffling like Bill Black's combo behind Elvis. Producer John Hammond's idle comment about cutting the tune, that they even tried it with a Dixieland band, sent collectors scurrying for a lost take. But Hammond may have meant… more »

They Say All Music Guide

By early 1932, the point at which this second volume in Document’s series begins, Big Bill Broonzy was well established on the Chicago music scene; although his music was beginning to take on an urbanized flavor, his forté was still country-blues, and the opening tracks here — “Mr. Conductor Man,” “Too-Too Train Blues” and “Bull Cow Blues” among them — are among his finest examples of the form. Of equal interest are the sides he subsequently recorded with his Jug Busters, a rather mysterious group which yielded just two tracks — “Rukus Juice Blues” and “M and O Blues” — but which pushed Broonzy further away from his rural roots; in all likelihood, the group also inaugurated his collaboration with the enigmatic yet renowned Black Bob, with whom he would cut a series of classic guitar and piano duets in the months to follow. – Jason Ankeny

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