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Blues Is My Business

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (14 ratings)
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Blues Is My Business album cover
01
Baby Please Don't Go
3:11
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02
In The Evening (When The Sun Goes Down)
3:25
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03
St. Louis Blues
2:25
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04
Feelin' Lowdown
4:43
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05
See See Rider
3:00
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06
All I Got Belongs To You
3:08
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07
Ridin' On Down
4:55
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08
Nobody Knows The Trouble I've Seen
3:26
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09
I Got Up One Mornin' Blues
4:40
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10
Treat Everybody
3:12
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11
Down By The Riverside
2:31
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12
Black, Brown, and White
2:35
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13
This Train (Bound For Glory)
3:10
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14
Midnight Special
1:59
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15
I Get The Blues When It Rains
2:43
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16
House Rent Stomp
2:09
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 16   Total Length: 51:12

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This is the Broonzy of the early 60's folk clubs

mr. mark

Not bad stuff, but the kind of blues that re-discovered greats of the 30's played at the East Coast folk clubs and festivals for a white Ivy League audience. Milder versions of the old blues such as "Baby Please Don't Go", along with protest songs, trad folk tunes, and Spirituals. Solo on accoustic guitar. Many older blues legends, such as Leadbelly, made good money on this kind of music. Not bad, but don't expect much of the old fire. Good sound, for early 60's live recordings-a bit echoey.

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Get Back, Black, Brown & White

Dvoodoo

(Get Back) Black, Brown & White is one of the most important anti-discrimination songs of the civil rights era, and was recorded for Mercury a decade or more before Sam Cooke or Curtis Mayfield would get any of their more hopeful 60's era anthems out.

eMusic Features

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Big Bill Broonzy: The Blues Ambassador

By John Morthland, Contributor

Consider Big Bill Broonzy. Here's a guy who wrote such blues standards as "Key to the Highway." As a writer-producer-sessions player for '30s blues A&R man Lester Melrose, he shaped the sound of blues in Chicago before there was a recognized Chicago blues style. He was one of the first bluesmen to be taken in by – and to shape his music for – white audiences, and he opened up the European market for postwar… more »

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The Black Fiddler’s Unlikely Home in Blues

By John Morthland, Contributor

In the 19th century, the most popular instruments played by black musicians in America were the banjo and the fiddle, and black and white string bands had virtually indistinguishable sounds. By the early days of the recording industry, though, both were on the way out. Yet the fiddle in particular was still prevalent enough that a fair number of black players were recorded, particularly in blues and jazz, and that's a good thing. With its… more »

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Outre Limits (And Then some)

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

The Concept Album, enshrined in such epic meisterworks as Tommy and The Wall, not to mention Styx's Kilroy Was Here, is often given short (about the only thing short about them) shrift in the instant d-load of a favored track. But ever since the invention of Long Playing discs allowed rock musicians the same four dimensions enjoyed by classical symphonists and operatic composers and jazz improvisers, there will be artists who think on a scale… more »

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Early Electric Guitarist George Barnes Mixes It Up

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

So who was the first electric guitarist on a Bob Dylan single? Well, duh, you can read a headline — not Mike Bloomfield, not Robbie Robertson, but George Barnes, in 1962. The record was Mixed-Up Confusion, the band skiffling like Bill Black's combo behind Elvis. Producer John Hammond's idle comment about cutting the tune, that they even tried it with a Dixieland band, sent collectors scurrying for a lost take. But Hammond may have meant… more »