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Lifestylez Ov Da Poor & Dangerous

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (56 ratings)
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Lifestylez Ov Da Poor & Dangerous album cover
01
Put It On
3:36
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02
MVP
3:38
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03
No Endz, No Skinz
3:29
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04
8 Iz Enuff
4:59
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05
All Black
4:21
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06
Danger Zone
3:36
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07
Street Struck
4:09
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08
Da Graveyard
5:24
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09
Lifestylez Ov Da Poor & Dangerous
3:21
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10
I Don't Understand It
4:20
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11
Fed Up Wit The Bullshit
3:52
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12
Let 'Em Have It "L"
3:50
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Album Information
EXPLICIT

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 48:35

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Loving it

vgemgarcia

yah this brings back the memories

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A definitive gangster rap album.

bartleyhagerman

I completely disagree with the Emusic review above. Almost every track on this album is CLASSIC, with very few forgettable moments. His only full-length LP released during his lifetime, Lifestylez showcases Big L's ferocious talent and gangster mentality. Because he was killed before his next album, The Big Picture, hit stores, you actually believe him when he raps about daily life on the block in Harlem. It's a shame that we will never know how much Big L's abilities could have improved, but this album proves that he could have gone down in history as one of the greats. Compare this album with B.I.G.'s Ready to Die. Everyone classifies 2pac as one of the greatest rappers of all time, which I agree with, but look at what Big L could do with his first LP. This is no-holds-barred TALENT.

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That Old School Shit

donbeatz

this album i think has Big L's best tracks.

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Lost and Found: The Mystery of Ultimate Force

By Hua Hsu, Contributor

For those of us who regard art as an index of ideas, hopes and anxieties over time, there is a mystique to things that were never able to see the proper light of their respective days: we regard the unfinished manuscript, the sketchbook drafts and the shelved album as phantom links in a given master's evolutionary chain. Popular music, with its tape-trading fanatics and readymade mythologies, is certainly given to this kind of speculation, though… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Having made a name for himself as a guest MC on D.I.T.C. (Diggin’ in the Crates) projects such as Diamond D.’s Stunts, Blunts & Hip-Hop and Showbiz & A.G.’s Runaway Slave, the flamboyantly gifted Lamont Coleman (aka Big L) dropped his debut in early 1995. A product of the mean streets of Harlem, L made his bones in the rap game with his rapid fire freestyle delivery and clever punchline-peppered rhymes. A patchwork album with a few outstanding cuts, Lifestylez fails to package the lightning-in-a-bottle talent of this cut-above MC. The album showcases L as a master of the lyrical stickup undressing his competition with kinetic metaphors and a brash comedic repertoire. The lead track, “Put It On” produced by Kid Capri, is a party cut with a criminal attitude. “M.V.P.” snatches a brief segment from DeBarge’s “Stay With Me” (later aggrandized on the Notorious B.I.G.’s popular remix of “One More Chance”). “Da Graveyard” features a young Cam’ron (here Killa Kam) and most notably a superb verse from a pre-Jigga Jay-Z (at the outset of his solo career). With better production and marketing, Big L might have found himself with a platinum album but instead he settled for platinum respect. This album captures the dynamic potential of a street legend, a legend who would later be gunned down in his prime. – M.F. DiBella

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