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#1 Record/Radio City

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01
Feel
3:33
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02
The Ballad Of El Goodo
4:20
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03
In The Street
2:55
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04
Thirteen
2:34
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05
Don't Lie To Me
3:08
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06
The India Song
2:21
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07
When My Baby's Beside Me
3:24
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08
My Life Is Right
3:07
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09
Give Me Another Chance
3:27
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10
Try Again
3:32
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11
Watch The Sunrise
3:44
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12
St 110/6
0:57
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13
In The Street
3:00
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14
O My Soul
5:38
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15
Life Is White
3:18
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16
Way Out West
2:51
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17
What's Going Ahn
2:41
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18
You Get What You Deserve
3:08
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19
Mod Lang
2:46
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20
Back Of A Car
2:46
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21
Daisy Glaze
3:49
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22
She's A Mover
3:13
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23
September Gurls
2:48
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24
Morpha Too
1:28
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25
I'm In Love With A Girl
1:47
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26
O My Soul
2:51
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 26   Total Length: 79:06

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

10.14.09
The Rosetta Stone of power pop
2009 | Label: Stax

Somewhere, armchair critics and befuddled Yankees are quibbling, neatly filing the first two records of Alex Chilton and Chris Bell away under "power pop." Yet, like Elvis and obvious Chilton precursor Jerry Lee Lewis, what else is Big Star's music really, released as it was on Memphis' own Ardent label (distributed through Stax, home of Otis Redding), recorded at the city's Ardent Studios by Dixie Fried auteur Jim Dickinson and named for a local supermarket… read more »

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The 10 Best Big Star Songs You Don’t Know

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2013 is a better time to be a Big Star fan than any time since the band was actually around. For years, their three albums — #1 Record, Radio City and Third/Sister Lovers — drifted in and out of print (to this day, nobody can completely agree on the correct running order for Third). These days, all three are consistently available, along with a fascinating box set, several live collections and the brand new… more »

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eMusic Selects: Army Navy

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When we last left Army Navy in 2008, they had released an attention-grabbing, hook-laden bright-n-shiny debut, were racking up placements in high-profile films and seemed to be on a trajectory aimed decidedly upward. But plenty can happen in three years, as it turns out: in the wake of their debut's modest success, Army chief Justin Kennedy found himself swept up in a whirlwind relationship, the kind that kills at the same time as it thrills.… more »

They Say All Music Guide

A two-fer combining Big Star’s first and second albums, #1 Record/Radio City remains a definitive document of early-’70s American power pop and a virtual blueprint for much of the finest alternative rock that came after it. The lone Big Star record to merit the full participation of founder Chris Bell, the brightly produced #1 Record splits the songwriting credits evenly between him and Alex Chilton (in the tradition of Lennon-McCartney). But from the beginning, the group is tearing apart at the seams: Bell and Chilton’s relationship seems less a working partnership than a battle of wills, and each possesses his own distinctive vision. The purist, Bell crafts electrifying and melodic classic pop like “Feel” and “In the Street,” while Chilton, the malcontent, pens luminous, melancholy ballads like “The Ballad of El Goodo” and “Thirteen.” Ultimately, their tension makes #1 Record brilliant. However, Radio City shifts gears dramatically: Bell is largely absent (though he guests, uncredited, on a few tracks, including the wonderful “Back of a Car”), allowing Chilton’s darker impulses free reign. From the raucous opener “O My Soul” onward, the new Big Star is noisier, edgier, and even more potent. Erratic mixing, spotty production, shaky performances — by all rights, Radio City should be a failure, yet Chilton is at his best when poised on the brink of disaster, and the songs hang together seemingly on faith and conviction alone. Each track recalls pop’s glory days, from the Kinks-ish snarl of “Mod Lang” to the Byrds-like guitar glow that adorns “Way Out West.” The much-celebrated “September Gurls” is indeed a classic — everything right and good about pop music distilled down to three minutes of pure genius. – Jason Ankeny

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