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Feeling The Elephant

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (10 ratings)
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Feeling The Elephant album cover
01
This Very Second
3:26
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02
Nothing Comes Close
2:41
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03
Feeling The Elephant
4:30
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04
Lisa Anne
3:15
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05
All At Once You Unzipped
3:10
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06
It'll Never Get Better Than This
4:08
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07
I Wanna Sit And Watch The Credits Roll
3:07
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08
Susan Scorned
5:02
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09
This Must Be The Place
3:31
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10
Everything's Closing Down
3:54
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 36:44

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Great power pop album!

jwhitcomb3

Bill Lloyd is a treasure. "Susan Scorned" is one of my all time favorite songs, but the whole album is delightful. Bill skips around stylistically, but the overall high quality of his songwriting holds it all together.

They Say All Music Guide

Bill Lloyd’s first solo album was actually released in 1987, predating the Nashville native’s association with Radney Foster in the mainstream country act Foster and Lloyd. However, at that time, it appeared on the tiny Boston indie Throbbing Lobster, just as that label was breathing its last. Thoughtfully, Atlanta’s DB Records picked up Feeling the Elephant after Foster and Lloyd’s commercial breakthrough and reissued it in a new cover with slightly improved sound. Good thing, too, because Feeling the Elephant beats the pants off of Foster and Lloyd’s fine but annoyingly slick albums. Recorded as (mostly) one-man band demos between 1983 and 1986, the ten songs on Feeling the Elephant range from Big Star wistful jangle (“This Very Second”) to Marshall Crenshaw roots pop (“Lisa Anne”), with side trips into the funky rock of “I Wanna Sit and Watch the Credits Roll” and the ghostly psychedelia of “Everything’s Closing Down.” It’s hard to believe that this wasn’t originally recorded as an album, because there’s a flow and organic unity to these well-sequenced songs that makes Feeling the Elephant a more satisfying listen than most power pop albums. The slightly new wavish, Let’s Active-like title track and the ultra-catchy jangle popper “Nothing Comes Close” are particular highlights, but this is a power pop joy from start to finish. – Stewart Mason

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