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Let It Bloom

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (26 ratings)
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Let It Bloom album cover
01
Sea of Blasphemy
1:38
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02
Can't Dance
1:54
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03
Boomerang
2:07
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04
Hippie, Hippie, Hoorah
3:34
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05
Not a Problem
3:03
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06
Gung Ho
1:50
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07
Everybody's Doin' It
2:44
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08
Feeling Gay
3:49
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09
Take Me Home (Back to Boone)
2:29
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10
Gentle Violence
2:13
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11
She's Gone
1:46
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12
Fairy Stories
1:53
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13
Dirty Hands
2:07
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14
Workin'
2:14
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15
Punk Slime
4:23
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16
Empassant
2:53
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 16   Total Length: 40:37

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Raw

pcaps

I think this album comes closest to capturing how amazingly awesome and raw these guys sound live. Really nothing can capture how they sound in person, but the rough, dissonant edges here give you a really good clue. At the very least you need to download Dirty Hands, though it's even better when you listen to it in context of the album.

eMusic Features

0

Who Are…Royal Headache

By Austin L. Ray, Contributor

Guitars are at the forefront of much of Royal Headache's self-titled debut, but not the noodling, 14-notes-a-second variety. Instead, these young Aussies specialize in the type of songs led by jangling, major-chord strums laced with just enough distortion to make it interesting. The Sydney foursome cut its teeth in Australia's punk and hardcore scenes before opting for something a little more mod, a little more power pop, a little more R&B. The resulting LP, which… more »

1

2011: Garage Rock Grows Up

By Mike McGonigal, Contributor

Four years ago, I flew from Portland to New York to see my favorite band, New Zealand's garage-pop trio the Clean, play three shows at a glorious pit called Cake Shop. The openers were Crystal Stilts, a Brooklyn group with no records out whose moody and noisy music pushed all the right buttons. I quickly befriended the group, especially guitarist JB Townsend and his then-girlfriend Frankie Rose, whose own band Vivian Girls were soon-to-be favorites.… more »

0

Who Are…The Coathangers

By Caryn Ganz, Contributor

The Coathangers couldn't play their instruments when they formed on a whim five years ago but now — somewhat to the dismay of singer/guitarist Julia Kugel — they're getting sort of awesome. "We're still kind of shitty. I tell myself that to keep the pressure off," she says on a break from her day job at a prom and bridal dress store. On their third disc, Larceny & Old Lace, the Atlanta quartet polish up… more »

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Who Are…Bass Drum Of Death

By Ian Cohen, Contributor

You can never accuse John Barrett of having his heart in the wrong place when he explains the genesis of what would eventually become Bass Drum of Death: "Basically, the whole purpose of me ever [playing songs] live was because I could get free drinks and make a little money and girls would talk to me. It worked a lot better than if I was just going out normally." Indeed, while their debut LP GB… more »

They Say All Music Guide

While most bands get tighter and “more professional” with the passage of time, Black Lips have opted to follow another path, and the Atlanta foursome dig deeper into the well of murky aural power on their third album, Let It Bloom. While garage rock at its most blessedly crude remains the band’s obvious reference point, guitarists Ian St. Pe and Cole Alexander (aka Old King Cole Younger) take their songs through enough twists and turns that no one is going to mistake them for either the White Stripes or the Chesterfield Kings, and the low-flying shards of guitar noise and echoing textures call up shades of the Fall, the Godz, the Cramps, the Witches, the early Velvet Underground (think Cleveland 1966, not the Banana album), and a few dozen other bands who enjoy playing around in the dark matter rather than burning out in the sunshine. And while Black Lips don’t sound much more “accomplished” than they did on their 2002 debut, they’ve gotten much better at working their magic in the studio, and Let It Bloom is their strongest effort to date, from the minor-chord stomp of “Punk Slime” and the sinister beachside romance of “Dirty Hands” to the French-accented dirge of “Hippie, Hippie, Hoorah” and the descent into the maelstrom of “She’s Gone.” Mike McHugh’s recording sorts out the good noise from the bad noise with just the right balance, and the result is an album that drips with just the right kind of bad karma. Let It Bloom will creep out your neighbors and you can dance to it, and can you ask for more than that? – Mark Deming

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