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Blind Willie McTell 1940

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Blind Willie McTell 1940 album cover
01
Just As Well Get Ready, You Got To Die; Climbing High Mountains, Tryin' To Get H
1:51
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02
Monologue On Accidents
2:50
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03
Boll Weevil
2:43
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04
Delia
3:05
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05
Dying Crapshooter's Blues
1:49
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06
Will Fox
5:44
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07
I Got To Cross The River Jordan
1:21
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08
Monolgue On Old Songs; Old Time Religion, Amen
3:08
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09
Amazing Grace
4:38
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10
Monologue On History Of The Blues; Monologue On Life As Maker Of Records; Monolo
1:38
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11
King Edward Blues
3:11
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12
Murderer's Home Blues
2:33
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13
Kill-It-Kid Rag
1:58
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14
Chainey
1:56
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15
I Got To Cross De River O'Jordan
2:56
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 41:21

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Bad track names: album 'upside down'

Bones

This is another "upside down" album. When downloading the last track, the name and track info is correct, but the actual audio is for track #1. Likewise you hear track #2 when you download the second-to-last track, etc. I've notified eMusic.

user avatar

Good Album, Bad Download

drojr

If you're interested in this album, go to Blind Willie McTell's main listing under "Blues". It's called "Devil Can't Hide from Me". This version is mixed up and mislabeled.

eMusic Features

2

Re-Documenting the Blues

By John Morthland, Contributor

Austrian collector Johnny Parth launched Document Records in 1986 in order to reissue the complete works of early 20th-century American roots musicians, mostly blues artists. Document's modus operandi was simple: Pick an artist and reissue the total output on however many albums — or, later, CDs — it took. Less-recorded artists — Geechie Wiley, say — shared a single album with other names; the more prolific — like Peetie Wheatstraw — got considerably more (seven… more »

0

Wordpower

By Hua Hsu, Contributor

First there was the word. Thousands of years later, legendary city planner Robert Moses razed the Bronx. And at some point in the '70s, hip-hop was born. So goes the creation myth, more or less, behind one of the most vital cultural forces of our lifetimes. Hip-hop has always been so certain in stride, so unquestionably cocksure, but its origins have always been a little murky. Musically, hip-hop charts a fairly clear and somewhat logical path: You can… more »

2

The Politic Melodic: A Campaign Song History

By Yancey Strickler, Contributor

In ways that grow more important by the day, the 1972 presidential contest between incumbent Republican Richard Nixon and Democrat George McGovern has dictated the tone, style and execution of every election since. It birthed the modern-day primary format; it defined and honed the press 'approach to all political coverage; it featured the most effective use of the presidency itself as a campaign asset; and, finally, even in defeat, McGovern's campaign dramatically shifted every campaign's… more »

They Say All Music Guide

By the time Georgia native William Samuel “Blind Willie” McTell earned ten dollars by sitting down in a hotel room in Atlanta on November 5, 1940, to preserve his artistry on 15 transcription platters for the Library of Congress, he had achieved a degree of fame by having recorded some 85 sides for multiple labels during the years 1927-1936. Document’s 1995 release of McTell’s Library of Congress recordings served as a welcome addition to several volumes of chronologically stacked McTell that had appeared on Document in 1990. McTell was a skilled 12-string guitarist, an expressive vocalist, and a well-versed interpreter of ragtime, spirituals, blues, and a wide range of rural folk forms. He performed well for the Library of Congress, sometimes narrating and explaining the social background for his music while fielding John Lomax’s rather careless and insensitive questions. What you get here is an excellent spectrum of McTell’s stylistic range and repertoire. His slide maneuvers on “Amazing Grace” are strikingly reminiscent of Blind Willie Johnson’s technique. The overall content of this hotel room recital points directly to McTell’s Atlantic session of November 1949. – arwulf arwulf

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